Jon Kabat-Zinn — The Healing Power of Mindfulness

1
00:00:01,376 —> 00:00:06,406
>> My name is Helen Damon Moore,
and I am the director of service

2
00:00:06,406 —> 00:00:09,396
and education at the
Tucker Foundation,

3
00:00:09,626 —> 00:00:11,436
here at Dartmouth college.

4
00:00:12,386 —> 00:00:17,476
I am honored to welcome you all
and to introduce John Cabotson

5
00:00:18,106 —> 00:00:22,136
on behalf of the Dartmouth
Hitchcock Medical Center

6
00:00:22,136 —> 00:00:25,966
Pailateive Care Service,
the Tucker Foundation,

7
00:00:26,716 —> 00:00:29,236
the Rubin Committee
of Dartmouth College,

8
00:00:29,786 —> 00:00:33,986
Alice Peck Day Hospital,
Dartmouth Medical School,

9
00:00:34,666 —> 00:00:36,946
the Norris Cotton Cancer Center,

10
00:00:37,446 —> 00:00:40,525
and the Valley Insight
Medication Society.

11
00:00:40,526 —> 00:00:45,096
Special thanks to Ira
Biak and Yvonne Corbet,

12
00:00:45,096 —> 00:00:50,745
and the Pailateive care service
for partnering on this project.

13
00:00:51,606 —> 00:00:55,136
And to those at tucker
who have worked so hard,

14
00:00:55,536 —> 00:00:59,936
and who are this week
celebrating the 60th anniversary

15
00:00:59,936 —> 00:01:05,036
year Tucker Foundation,
Dartmouth’s center for service,

16
00:01:05,075 —> 00:01:07,815
spirituality, and
social justice.

17
00:01:09,426 —> 00:01:12,486
We are pleased to
welcome Dr. John Cabotson

18
00:01:12,486 —> 00:01:16,336
to Dartmouth college
today for the second time.

19
00:01:16,336 —> 00:01:22,006
Cabotson first visited
Dartmouth in the summer of 1984

20
00:01:22,446 —> 00:01:25,926
when the college and the
Connecticut river served

21
00:01:25,926 —> 00:01:29,906
as the training camp for the
men’s Olympic rowing team.

22
00:01:30,856 —> 00:01:35,336
He was the meditation trainer
for the team, helping them

23
00:01:35,336 —> 00:01:37,986
to optimize their
mental performance.

24
00:01:38,586 —> 00:01:43,636
Today he is here to help
optimize our performance.

25
00:01:44,866 —> 00:01:49,756
John Cabotson hold an a Ph.D.
in molecular biology from MIT.

26
00:01:49,946 —> 00:01:54,765
He is professor of medicine
emeritus at the University

27
00:01:54,766 —> 00:01:58,976
of Massachusetts Medical School
and founder of the Center

28
00:01:58,976 —> 00:02:04,086
For Mindfulness and Medicine,
Healthcare, and Society

29
00:02:04,376 —> 00:02:07,596
and its mindfulness-based
stress reduction clinic.

30
00:02:08,196 —> 00:02:10,996
He is the author of
numerous best-selling books,

31
00:02:11,146 —> 00:02:13,905
including Full Catastrophe
Living,

32
00:02:14,636 —> 00:02:19,356
Wherever You Go There You
Are, Coming to Our Senses,

33
00:02:19,626 —> 00:02:22,236
and the Mindful Way
Through Depression,

34
00:02:22,626 —> 00:02:25,896
co-authors with Williams,
Tisdale, and Siegal.

35
00:02:27,116 —> 00:02:32,206
Dr. Cabotson’s research focuses
on mind-body interactions

36
00:02:32,206 —> 00:02:35,585
for healing, and on the
clinical applications

37
00:02:35,936 —> 00:02:40,336
and cost effectiveness of
mindfulness training for people

38
00:02:40,336 —> 00:02:43,676
with chronic pain and
stress-related disorders,

39
00:02:44,166 —> 00:02:45,426
including the effects

40
00:02:45,426 —> 00:02:48,905
of mindfulness-based stress
reduction on the brain.

41
00:02:49,836 —> 00:02:53,166
His current projects include
editing the Mind’s Own

42
00:02:53,166 —> 00:02:57,826
Physician, with Richard
Davidson, and guest co-editing

43
00:02:57,826 —> 00:03:00,506
with Mark Williams
a special issue

44
00:03:00,506 —> 00:03:03,316
of The Journal Contemporary
Buddhism.

45
00:03:03,396 —> 00:03:08,416
Dr. Cabotson’s work
has contributed hugely

46
00:03:08,876 —> 00:03:11,256
to a growing movement
of mindfulness

47
00:03:11,406 —> 00:03:16,176
in main stream institutions
such as medicine, psychology,

48
00:03:16,466 —> 00:03:21,676
healthcare, schools and
colleges, corporations, prisons,

49
00:03:21,676 —> 00:03:23,315
and professional sports.

50
00:03:24,386 —> 00:03:27,275
Courtesy of Kerry Jo Grant
[Assumed spelling] here

51
00:03:27,276 —> 00:03:31,706
in our health promotion
department, Dr. Cabotson

52
00:03:31,706 —> 00:03:35,706
and his work have even made
their way to the inside

53
00:03:35,706 —> 00:03:37,426
of our bathroom doors.

54
00:03:38,176 —> 00:03:40,965
Featured as they are
in the current edition

55
00:03:40,966 —> 00:03:44,146
of the Dartmouth College
Stall Street Journal.

56
00:03:45,876 —> 00:03:49,336
Please join me in
welcoming John Cabotson back

57
00:03:49,916 —> 00:03:51,046
to Dartmouth college.

58
00:03:53,516 —> 00:04:09,646
[ Applause ]

59
00:04:10,146 —> 00:04:10,405
>> Thank you.

60
00:04:10,516 —> 00:04:12,016
It’s a delight to be here.

61
00:04:12,136 —> 00:04:15,686
Do I have to have the light
this bright in my eyes?

62
00:04:15,806 —> 00:04:19,476
Because maybe you could
tone it down a little bit

63
00:04:19,986 —> 00:04:21,305
so people can still see me,

64
00:04:21,305 —> 00:04:23,445
but I’d like to be
able to see you too.

65
00:04:23,866 —> 00:04:28,546
It’s a delight to be here.

66
00:04:28,546 —> 00:04:30,646
It’s nice to walk into a theater

67
00:04:30,646 —> 00:04:33,026
where mindfulness
is on the marquee.

68
00:04:34,326 —> 00:04:36,996
You know you’ve really made
it when it’s on the marquee,

69
00:04:36,996 —> 00:04:38,176
along with Frankenstein.

70
00:04:38,636 —> 00:04:43,636
So — it’s like, you’re part of
the main stream, so to speak,

71
00:04:43,636 —> 00:04:47,906
however that goes from moment
to moment and from day-to-day.

72
00:04:48,896 —> 00:04:54,066
But it’s really a delight to be
here, and I am here basically

73
00:04:54,336 —> 00:04:58,986
because of Helen Damon Moore and
her work, which I actually got

74
00:04:58,986 —> 00:05:00,846
to see at University
of Iowa, when she was

75
00:05:00,936 —> 00:05:02,385
at Iowa before coming here.

76
00:05:03,466 —> 00:05:08,916
And also Dr. Ira
Biak, who I met in —

77
00:05:10,256 —> 00:05:14,095
in Ireland about two years ago,
almost exactly two years ago.

78
00:05:14,606 —> 00:05:17,896
And was just incredibly
impressed with what he’s doing

79
00:05:17,896 —> 00:05:20,306
with integrative medicine
and palliative care.

80
00:05:20,306 —> 00:05:23,986
And so you know, it’s
like I don’t live that far

81
00:05:24,846 —> 00:05:29,286
from this place, and got in the
car this morning and drove up.

82
00:05:29,286 —> 00:05:32,826
And I’m really happy to be
here for the next three days.

83
00:05:33,616 —> 00:05:42,286
And you know, so to have this
many people come out at 4:30

84
00:05:42,286 —> 00:05:45,256
on a sunny afternoon after
the kind of winter we had,

85
00:05:45,256 —> 00:05:53,246
to a talk about mindfulness is
really some kind of an indicator

86
00:05:53,246 —> 00:05:57,025
that something has
shifted in the society.

87
00:05:57,326 —> 00:05:59,746
You all have better
things to do, I’m sure,

88
00:05:59,746 —> 00:06:02,085
this afternoon, than
to come here.

89
00:06:02,376 —> 00:06:06,306
Unless you have some
kind of real intuition

90
00:06:08,726 —> 00:06:14,096
about what the healing power
of mindfulness might be.

91
00:06:14,676 —> 00:06:17,166
And then it might actually
be incredibly valuable

92
00:06:17,226 —> 00:06:21,506
to spend the end of a nice
sunny Thursday afternoon

93
00:06:22,476 —> 00:06:23,956
here together.

94
00:06:23,956 —> 00:06:27,896
So this talk is not
about me or what I have

95
00:06:27,996 —> 00:06:29,885
to say, it’s about us.

96
00:06:29,886 —> 00:06:31,736
It’s about every
single one of us,

97
00:06:32,136 —> 00:06:37,126
and in some sense what the
potential is, as the slide says,

98
00:06:37,666 —> 00:06:41,146
for living your moments as
if they really mattered.

99
00:06:41,146 —> 00:06:45,186
And I put a little
asterisk in there,

100
00:06:45,186 —> 00:06:51,385
and the reason they too is

101
00:06:51,386 —> 00:06:56,496
because we’re only
alive when we’re alive.

102
00:06:57,826 —> 00:07:03,336
This seems kind of a no-brainer,
but you could say that a lot

103
00:07:03,336 —> 00:07:07,386
of our lives we’re walking
around with a no-brainer,

104
00:07:07,386 —> 00:07:11,246
or just basically no brain,
or the brain is on auto pilot

105
00:07:11,246 —> 00:07:12,135
or something like that.

106
00:07:12,136 —> 00:07:13,916
And what mindfulness is really

107
00:07:13,976 —> 00:07:17,906
about is bringing it back
on line, so to speak.

108
00:07:17,906 —> 00:07:20,966
In the present moment,
because that turns

109
00:07:20,966 —> 00:07:24,526
out to be the only moment
that any of us ever have.

110
00:07:25,136 —> 00:07:29,286
But we’re so good at thinking,
so incredibly good at thinking,

111
00:07:29,286 —> 00:07:32,516
that we can spend enormous
amounts of our time

112
00:07:32,516 —> 00:07:34,446
and energy absorbed in the past.

113
00:07:34,446 —> 00:07:37,726
Have you noticed that?

114
00:07:37,776 —> 00:07:41,666
Just incredible preoccupations
about who’s to blame

115
00:07:41,666 —> 00:07:43,046
about why it’s like this.

116
00:07:43,936 —> 00:07:45,936
Or how great it was
in the good old days,

117
00:07:45,936 —> 00:07:48,006
and why can’t it
be that way now.

118
00:07:48,006 —> 00:07:52,126
So there’s a tremendous
attraction to the past

119
00:07:52,126 —> 00:07:56,575
and tremendous aversion,
but whether it’s attraction

120
00:07:56,576 —> 00:07:58,946
or aversion, we spend
a lot of time there.

121
00:07:59,626 —> 00:08:00,686
Would you agree?

122
00:08:00,686 —> 00:08:03,536
Have you noticed that a lot
of the time if you check

123
00:08:04,096 —> 00:08:07,206
on what your mind is up
to, it’s up to memory.

124
00:08:07,836 —> 00:08:11,026
It’s up to thinking about things

125
00:08:11,086 —> 00:08:14,666
that are already over,
to a large degree.

126
00:08:15,576 —> 00:08:19,326
The other favorite
preoccupation of the mind is

127
00:08:19,326 —> 00:08:20,576
in the opposite direction.

128
00:08:21,336 —> 00:08:23,566
The future.

129
00:08:25,306 —> 00:08:28,756
And if again you check in every
once come a while just to,

130
00:08:28,756 —> 00:08:32,795
you know, sometimes I
like to say you know,

131
00:08:32,846 —> 00:08:34,756
you can call yourself up.

132
00:08:36,046 —> 00:08:39,686
You may have to, you know,
because we’re on 24-7,

133
00:08:39,686 —> 00:08:41,546
we’re just infinitely connected.

134
00:08:41,876 —> 00:08:44,076
Probably every single person has
one of these in their pocket,

135
00:08:44,076 —> 00:08:45,806
although I hope there
are some exceptions.

136
00:08:46,126 —> 00:08:50,286
But — and they’re called
smart phones, you know?

137
00:08:50,486 —> 00:08:52,876
But they’re not.

138
00:08:52,996 —> 00:08:56,066
But we actually — but
they can really dumb us

139
00:08:56,096 —> 00:09:00,126
down because we can be
infinitely connected everywhere

140
00:09:00,476 —> 00:09:01,196
except here.

141
00:09:01,866 —> 00:09:04,586
And so we may need
to call ourselves

142
00:09:04,586 —> 00:09:05,856
up every once in a while.

143
00:09:05,906 —> 00:09:08,746
John, are you actually here?

144
00:09:08,746 —> 00:09:11,156
And the answer is no, I’m
off in the future thinking.

145
00:09:11,666 —> 00:09:13,786
And one of our favorite
preoccupations —

146
00:09:13,816 —> 00:09:18,636
and by the way, of course you’ll
get a bill from AT&T or Verizon.

147
00:09:19,446 —> 00:09:24,686
But seriously, what — what
are our favorite preoccupations

148
00:09:24,686 —> 00:09:25,376
in the future?

149
00:09:25,996 —> 00:09:28,186
Well, one is worrying.

150
00:09:29,116 —> 00:09:30,576
I don’t know about
the north country,

151
00:09:30,576 —> 00:09:32,186
maybe you’ve gone
beyond worrying.

152
00:09:32,186 —> 00:09:37,836
The rest of the world a lot
of worry about things that —

153
00:09:39,006 —> 00:09:42,266
that haven’t happened
yet and may never happen.

154
00:09:42,476 —> 00:09:46,456
In fact, Mark Twain is
famous for having said,

155
00:09:46,536 —> 00:09:50,386
you’ve probably heard this
in a lot of different guises,

156
00:09:50,386 —> 00:09:53,976
but he’s famous for having
said there’s been a huge amount

157
00:09:53,976 —> 00:09:56,566
of tragedy in my life, and
some of it actually happened.

158
00:09:57,396 —> 00:10:02,646
But — but there is this
saying that you know, we die —

159
00:10:02,866 —> 00:10:04,896
he died a thousand deaths.

160
00:10:04,896 —> 00:10:07,526
I mean , we drive
ourselves crazy over things

161
00:10:07,796 —> 00:10:09,116
that are not going
to be happening

162
00:10:09,116 —> 00:10:12,906
because we’re not smart enough
to actually forecast the future,

163
00:10:13,226 —> 00:10:16,336
but that doesn’t prevent us
from driving ourselves crazy,

164
00:10:16,336 —> 00:10:20,026
and perseverating over and over
and over about what will happen.

165
00:10:20,026 —> 00:10:23,445
And then something else happens
because we’re not that smart.

166
00:10:23,546 —> 00:10:27,896
So something else happens,
and we say we’re blind-sided.

167
00:10:28,216 —> 00:10:32,586
Now how many of you would like
the future to be different

168
00:10:32,586 —> 00:10:35,266
from the way — the way we
think it’s going to turn out.

169
00:10:35,266 —> 00:10:38,266
Anybody ever find yourself
wishing the future was going

170
00:10:38,266 —> 00:10:41,305
to be like, majorly different,
that we’d make some kind

171
00:10:41,306 —> 00:10:42,306
of change in the world?

172
00:10:42,496 —> 00:10:45,496
Raise your hands, I want to
just feel in the audience.

173
00:10:45,766 —> 00:10:48,986
Okay, I heard social justice
mentioned earlier, and you know,

174
00:10:48,986 —> 00:10:51,216
this is after all a university

175
00:10:51,216 —> 00:10:53,506
or I guess you call
yourself a college.

176
00:10:53,636 —> 00:10:57,606
You know, a campus
kind of situation.

177
00:10:57,606 —> 00:11:03,486
So it doesn’t surprise me.

178
00:11:03,576 —> 00:11:08,136
But this — this kind

179
00:11:08,136 —> 00:11:13,445
of engagement really
requires thinking about, like,

180
00:11:14,106 —> 00:11:16,486
what it means to make
the future different.

181
00:11:16,686 —> 00:11:20,476
How can we possibly
apply any leverage,

182
00:11:20,476 —> 00:11:25,806
could we kind an Archimedes,
you know, fulcrum in which

183
00:11:25,806 —> 00:11:27,806
to influence the future.

184
00:11:28,426 —> 00:11:31,386
There’s only one fulcrum
that I know for that,

185
00:11:31,956 —> 00:11:33,086
and that is the present.

186
00:11:33,716 —> 00:11:37,006
Because guess what, we’re
living in the future

187
00:11:37,376 —> 00:11:40,266
of every single moment
in all of our lives

188
00:11:40,476 —> 00:11:41,466
that came before this one.

189
00:11:41,466 —> 00:11:45,476
Do you remember back, I mean,
I see there’s kind of a range

190
00:11:45,476 —> 00:11:47,686
of ages, although
most of you don’t look

191
00:11:47,686 —> 00:11:49,556
like you’re college
students, I’ve got to say.

192
00:11:50,056 —> 00:11:52,076
And I’m a little disappointed.

193
00:11:52,076 —> 00:11:55,596
I mean, I — you know, not that
I’m disappointed that you came,

194
00:11:55,596 —> 00:11:58,516
but I’d like to see a lot
more college students.

195
00:11:58,666 —> 00:12:02,576
They look at — they’re going
to Frankenstein probably, later.

196
00:12:03,066 —> 00:12:06,476
It’s an awkward time of
day for the young people.

197
00:12:06,596 —> 00:12:09,576
How many of you are
under 25, 25 and under.

198
00:12:10,006 —> 00:12:11,976
Oh, so I’m wrong.

199
00:12:11,976 —> 00:12:13,406
That’s really nice to be wrong.

200
00:12:13,406 —> 00:12:20,195
So — really — so I was going
to say to the older people,

201
00:12:20,436 —> 00:12:22,636
but maybe you did it when
you were even younger.

202
00:12:22,636 —> 00:12:24,976
Do you remember before
you got into college here,

203
00:12:25,696 —> 00:12:29,226
and probably you got into
planning what the courses were

204
00:12:29,226 —> 00:12:31,316
that you were going to take when
you got ahold of the catalog,

205
00:12:31,316 —> 00:12:34,036
or you went on line
and began planning, oh,

206
00:12:34,036 —> 00:12:35,996
in the freshman year
I’ll take this,

207
00:12:35,996 —> 00:12:38,006
and the sophomore year,
and the junior year.

208
00:12:38,176 —> 00:12:40,846
And maybe you planned even
who you’re going to meet

209
00:12:40,846 —> 00:12:42,146
and who you’re going to marry,

210
00:12:42,146 —> 00:12:44,016
and what your children
are going to look like.

211
00:12:44,406 —> 00:12:46,766
Does that sound familiar,
that sometimes we do

212
00:12:46,766 —> 00:12:47,675
that when we’re young.

213
00:12:47,676 —> 00:12:53,786
And we think that it’s all
going to turn out in the future.

214
00:12:54,676 —> 00:12:58,716
So no matter what your age
is, I’ve got news for you.

215
00:12:59,896 —> 00:13:00,736
This is it.

216
00:13:01,486 —> 00:13:02,456
It already turned out.

217
00:13:02,456 —> 00:13:06,126
How did it turn out?

218
00:13:06,126 —> 00:13:08,286
It turned out just like this.

219
00:13:09,016 —> 00:13:12,575
In any moment your
life is just like this.

220
00:13:13,016 —> 00:13:15,815
Not happy with it , a
little bit sad or depressed

221
00:13:15,816 —> 00:13:18,956
or wishing it was different
— that’s not a problem.

222
00:13:19,836 —> 00:13:20,786
That’s not a problem.

223
00:13:21,856 —> 00:13:26,196
Because we can always sort of
feel like okay, how are we going

224
00:13:26,196 —> 00:13:31,246
to be in relationship to this,
and of course life is not easy.

225
00:13:32,156 —> 00:13:35,065
And a lot of times we’re faced
with enormous challenges,

226
00:13:35,066 —> 00:13:36,616
sometimes with enormous pain.

227
00:13:36,616 —> 00:13:37,976
Sometimes with enormous threat.

228
00:13:38,936 —> 00:13:40,816
And that’s part of
the human condition.

229
00:13:41,546 —> 00:13:45,006
But the real interesting
question when it concerns, say,

230
00:13:45,006 —> 00:13:47,846
the future, and concerns living

231
00:13:47,846 —> 00:13:51,236
as if life really mattered
is can we actually be

232
00:13:51,236 —> 00:13:53,576
in the present moment
when things are not kind

233
00:13:53,576 —> 00:13:55,616
of the way we thought
they would be.

234
00:13:56,436 —> 00:13:59,676
Or sometimes the
shorthand for it is well,

235
00:13:59,906 —> 00:14:02,935
I didn’t sign up for this.

236
00:14:03,276 —> 00:14:06,506
I mean, or another way
to put it, sometimes,

237
00:14:06,506 —> 00:14:12,966
maybe no offense meant, but how
did I get born into this family,

238
00:14:13,286 —> 00:14:16,106
or who are all these
crazy people,

239
00:14:16,106 —> 00:14:17,956
why am I the only sane person.

240
00:14:18,006 —> 00:14:19,165
And you know, when you’re

241
00:14:19,166 —> 00:14:24,556
in a family no one else can
know the kind of genetic disease

242
00:14:24,556 —> 00:14:26,656
of that particular family,

243
00:14:26,716 —> 00:14:33,836
that everybody suffers
from except you.

244
00:14:34,246 —> 00:14:36,756
So if we hope for the
future to be different,

245
00:14:37,146 —> 00:14:39,726
the only place we
have to stand is now.

246
00:14:41,696 —> 00:14:43,706
Because first of
all, it’s the —

247
00:14:44,056 —> 00:14:46,636
it’s the future of
all the moments

248
00:14:46,636 —> 00:14:47,506
that have come before us.

249
00:14:47,506 —> 00:14:50,925
So if you want to be in
the future, here you are.

250
00:14:54,256 —> 00:14:56,815
This is actually non trivial,
it’s not just oh yeah,

251
00:14:56,816 —> 00:14:58,476
tell us something interesting.

252
00:14:59,626 —> 00:15:04,856
Because — because what it
invites is a kind of shift

253
00:15:05,256 —> 00:15:08,045
in perception and a
shift in awareness,

254
00:15:08,046 —> 00:15:10,836
a shift in consciousness,
that allows us

255
00:15:10,836 —> 00:15:14,346
to actually live our lives
as if they really mattered,

256
00:15:14,346 —> 00:15:16,136
and the only moment
we ever have.

257
00:15:16,396 —> 00:15:18,325
And part of that
means being embodied.

258
00:15:19,656 —> 00:15:26,295
Because a lot of the time you
know, we are lost in thought.

259
00:15:27,226 —> 00:15:29,346
That’s another thing
you’ll notice, if you start

260
00:15:29,346 —> 00:15:33,336
to pay attention to your mind,
is that it’s all over the place.

261
00:15:34,326 —> 00:15:35,086
It’s all over the place.

262
00:15:35,346 —> 00:15:37,946
You don’t even have to
meditate for that to happen.

263
00:15:37,946 —> 00:15:39,986
It’s just default mode.

264
00:15:40,836 —> 00:15:42,126
It’s default mode.

265
00:15:42,126 —> 00:15:43,856
You don’t even have
to have a smart phone.

266
00:15:44,066 —> 00:15:45,516
You don’t even have
to have e-mail.

267
00:15:45,716 —> 00:15:47,256
You don’t even have
to have a computer.

268
00:15:47,466 —> 00:15:50,276
It’s the default mode of the
mind to be all over the place.

269
00:15:51,176 —> 00:15:52,586
It thinks this, and thinks that.

270
00:15:52,586 —> 00:15:55,336
And it likes this
and hates that.

271
00:15:55,336 —> 00:15:57,256
And wants you to approach
this, but really wants

272
00:15:57,256 —> 00:15:58,065
to stay away from that.

273
00:15:58,066 —> 00:16:00,606
And it’s like, wired
into our biology.

274
00:16:00,606 —> 00:16:02,306
It’s called approach avoidance.

275
00:16:02,306 —> 00:16:04,266
And it’s kind of, you know,

276
00:16:04,266 —> 00:16:07,075
the hemispheres are actually
somewhat divided in terms

277
00:16:07,076 —> 00:16:10,866
of left hemisphere and the
frontal cortical region,

278
00:16:11,136 —> 00:16:12,906
is more approach-related.

279
00:16:14,246 —> 00:16:17,036
And right acre vacation, more —

280
00:16:17,036 —> 00:16:20,955
and that’s one of the
fundamental biological,

281
00:16:21,376 —> 00:16:24,876
you know, features
of living systems.

282
00:16:25,716 —> 00:16:28,246
Move towards food,
move away from danger.

283
00:16:28,816 —> 00:16:29,666
Perfectly natural.

284
00:16:30,886 —> 00:16:33,795
But how we actually
modulate those impulses

285
00:16:33,796 —> 00:16:36,346
and those reflexes,
and those, you know,

286
00:16:36,346 —> 00:16:42,116
kinds of unconscious urges
that drive us and cause us

287
00:16:42,116 —> 00:16:43,806
to be reactive a
lot of the time.

288
00:16:44,166 —> 00:16:45,766
Is really an art form.

289
00:16:45,766 —> 00:16:51,425
It’s the art, if you
will, of living our lives

290
00:16:51,426 —> 00:16:52,656
as if they really mattered.

291
00:16:53,886 —> 00:16:58,216
And when we begin to
actually drop in on ourselves,

292
00:16:58,906 —> 00:17:05,495
and I brought a few
— a few props.

293
00:17:05,675 —> 00:17:10,005
You know, so sometimes I
say when we begin to drop

294
00:17:10,006 —> 00:17:17,856
in on ourselves, you know, we
can actually reclaim this moment

295
00:17:18,036 —> 00:17:25,026
in this body with this heart,
with this mind, and shift —

296
00:17:25,026 —> 00:17:27,556
begin to shift the
tea fault setting

297
00:17:27,766 —> 00:17:29,106
on how we live ourselves.

298
00:17:30,136 —> 00:17:36,956
Begin to actually move in a
direction of greater balance

299
00:17:37,366 —> 00:17:43,606
of mind, greater groundedness
in the body, greater clarity

300
00:17:43,606 —> 00:17:46,266
of sight, greater, if you will,

301
00:17:48,386 —> 00:17:52,406
recognition of what’s actually
unfolding moment by moment,

302
00:17:52,626 —> 00:17:57,166
that’s not so conditioned by
whether we like it or not.

303
00:17:58,626 —> 00:18:03,476
Because the world, maybe you
haven’t noticed this yet,

304
00:18:04,666 —> 00:18:06,735
but it’s not actually organized

305
00:18:06,736 —> 00:18:08,626
around you being the
center of the universe.

306
00:18:11,176 —> 00:18:14,316
I know that’s really
disappointing.

307
00:18:14,316 —> 00:18:18,006
Because you were, I’m guessing
now, don’t take offense, again,

308
00:18:18,216 —> 00:18:20,535
I’m guessing you are
entirely organized

309
00:18:20,536 —> 00:18:22,066
around you being the
center of the universe.

310
00:18:22,376 —> 00:18:23,646
Every single one of us is.

311
00:18:24,056 —> 00:18:25,336
It’s almost unavoidable.

312
00:18:26,956 —> 00:18:28,196
It’s almost unavoidable.

313
00:18:28,196 —> 00:18:32,826
And that has representations
in the brain, it’s turning out.

314
00:18:33,596 —> 00:18:40,306
That there are medial — medial
networks in the frontal cortex

315
00:18:40,306 —> 00:18:44,356
and — that are — is actually
called the default mode.

316
00:18:44,766 —> 00:18:48,126
And it’s what we think
brains, neuro scientists think,

317
00:18:48,276 —> 00:18:50,646
it’s what’s happening when
you’re not doing anything.

318
00:18:52,076 —> 00:18:53,536
Well, turns out when
you’re not doing anything,

319
00:18:53,536 —> 00:18:55,396
you’re very busy.

320
00:18:56,506 —> 00:18:58,476
You’re very, very, very busy.

321
00:18:59,716 —> 00:19:01,706
And one of the things
what’s described is

322
00:19:01,706 —> 00:19:04,136
that your mind wandering.

323
00:19:05,306 —> 00:19:06,996
And now there’s an entire field

324
00:19:06,996 —> 00:19:09,606
in neuro science focused
on mind wandering.

325
00:19:11,996 —> 00:19:13,046
How many of you have noticed

326
00:19:13,046 —> 00:19:15,486
that your mind sometimes
just has a mind of its own.

327
00:19:15,486 —> 00:19:18,576
It goes here, it goes there,
it likes to be entertained.

328
00:19:19,046 —> 00:19:20,546
You know, it’s very
entertaining.

329
00:19:20,826 —> 00:19:27,346
So yeah, that’s what’s
called the default mode.

330
00:19:27,346 —> 00:19:30,306
Now another name for it
is the narrative network.

331
00:19:30,426 —> 00:19:33,795
So it’s like we are continually
constructing narratives

332
00:19:33,796 —> 00:19:34,716
about ourselves.

333
00:19:35,736 —> 00:19:38,116
I mean, after all, it’s
the favorite topic, right?

334
00:19:38,196 —> 00:19:41,416
Me. What could be more
interesting than me?

335
00:19:42,916 —> 00:19:44,755
The story of me, starring — me.

336
00:19:45,336 —> 00:19:50,866
And if you start
to pay attention,

337
00:19:50,866 —> 00:19:53,776
because what we’re talking
about, what mindfulness is,

338
00:19:53,776 —> 00:19:56,846
it’s actually weariness, okay?

339
00:19:57,626 —> 00:19:59,796
And it’s cultivated
by paying attention.

340
00:20:01,326 —> 00:20:03,286
So just to get clear about this,

341
00:20:03,286 —> 00:20:06,756
that doesn’t sound very
Buddhist, does it, so far?

342
00:20:07,046 —> 00:20:11,306
Or very Asian or mystical
or very — anything.

343
00:20:11,306 —> 00:20:16,086
I mean, it’s just
paying attention.

344
00:20:16,086 —> 00:20:18,486
How many teachers are
there in the audience,

345
00:20:19,036 —> 00:20:21,236
whatever level you’re
teaching at, raise your hand

346
00:20:21,236 —> 00:20:21,906
so I can feel that —

347
00:20:22,196 —> 00:20:24,545
okay, don’t you want your
students to pay attention?

348
00:20:25,506 —> 00:20:28,136
It’s non trivial to get
them to pay attention.

349
00:20:28,796 —> 00:20:30,356
First you might have
to be interesting.

350
00:20:30,456 —> 00:20:33,535
That itself is a challenge.

351
00:20:33,716 —> 00:20:36,136
Second, you might have to make
the subject matter interesting.

352
00:20:36,136 —> 00:20:37,856
That’s also a challenge.

353
00:20:38,706 —> 00:20:41,575
But third, it’s like,
I remember as a product

354
00:20:41,576 —> 00:20:44,666
of the New York product schools
having teachers actually yell

355
00:20:44,666 —> 00:20:46,056
at us to pay attention.

356
00:20:47,326 —> 00:20:51,466
But that’s not a very
effective way to get people

357
00:20:51,466 —> 00:20:55,295
to pay attention, because turns
out that attending is something

358
00:20:55,296 —> 00:20:56,416
that you need to learn.

359
00:20:57,606 —> 00:20:59,596
It’s a learnable skill.

360
00:20:59,936 —> 00:21:01,886
But instead of being
taught to pay attention,

361
00:21:02,266 —> 00:21:04,326
you’re just told
who pay attention.

362
00:21:04,946 —> 00:21:06,896
Get with the program,
pay attention.

363
00:21:07,456 —> 00:21:10,636
And a lot of people pay
attention very differently.

364
00:21:10,636 —> 00:21:12,556
Some pay attention auditorily,

365
00:21:12,556 —> 00:21:14,546
they’re really predominantly
auditory.

366
00:21:14,896 —> 00:21:17,046
Some people can’t
do auditory so well,

367
00:21:17,046 —> 00:21:18,356
they’ve got to see it visually.

368
00:21:18,356 —> 00:21:20,466
Other people’s more
intuitive, they feel it

369
00:21:20,466 —> 00:21:23,765
with their bodies,
in a certain way.

370
00:21:25,266 —> 00:21:32,346
So this is incredibly important
in education at all levels,

371
00:21:32,346 —> 00:21:35,366
because you know, as they
say about orchestras,

372
00:21:35,366 —> 00:21:38,316
even the greatest of orchestras,
with the greatest musicians

373
00:21:38,316 —> 00:21:40,486
with the greatest instruments
playing the greatest music,

374
00:21:40,906 —> 00:21:43,726
before they perform
they get together

375
00:21:43,726 —> 00:21:45,336
and they tune their instruments.

376
00:21:46,286 —> 00:21:47,836
First to themselves.

377
00:21:48,286 —> 00:21:49,176
Then with each other.

378
00:21:50,026 —> 00:21:51,596
Until there’s a kind
of dropping,

379
00:21:52,006 —> 00:21:53,446
if you don’t mind me
putting it that way,

380
00:21:54,416 —> 00:22:03,525
into kind of resonance, call
it an A. Call it what you like,

381
00:22:03,736 —> 00:22:10,986
but that kind of interconnected
feeling that we are

382
00:22:11,056 —> 00:22:12,546
in some space together.

383
00:22:13,596 —> 00:22:15,146
You could call it relationality.

384
00:22:16,616 —> 00:22:20,176
And so mindfulness is
the awareness that arises

385
00:22:20,206 —> 00:22:23,745
by paying attention on
purpose in the present moment.

386
00:22:24,536 —> 00:22:26,646
Paying attention on purpose

387
00:22:27,096 —> 00:22:29,866
in the present moment
and non judgmentally.

388
00:22:30,036 —> 00:22:33,686
Now non judgmentally, that’s
the kicker, because as I said,

389
00:22:33,686 —> 00:22:36,106
the default network is
operating constantly ,

390
00:22:36,106 —> 00:22:39,376
and the default network has
got ideas about everything.

391
00:22:40,416 —> 00:22:41,906
It’s judging constantly.

392
00:22:42,036 —> 00:22:45,436
So non judgmental doesn’t
mean that you won’t be judging

393
00:22:45,656 —> 00:22:49,136
when you actually start to pay
attention to what’s on your mind

394
00:22:49,136 —> 00:22:50,896
or what’s going on in your life.

395
00:22:50,896 —> 00:22:54,216
But you’ll notice how much you
are judging, how much you want

396
00:22:54,216 —> 00:22:56,025
to approach this
and push away that.

397
00:22:56,296 —> 00:22:59,016
And you’ll just allow that
whole thing to be there,

398
00:22:59,236 —> 00:23:01,406
as if you just put out
the welcome mat for it.

399
00:23:01,636 —> 00:23:06,936
Okay, I’m not going to have
an opinion about my opinions.

400
00:23:07,286 —> 00:23:14,126
I’m just going to let it all
rain down for — for a moment.

401
00:23:14,716 —> 00:23:19,325
Can you feel how radical a shift
that would be in your life,

402
00:23:19,706 —> 00:23:22,966
to just take one moment and
allow everything to be as it is,

403
00:23:23,206 —> 00:23:24,896
instead of wishing it
was one way or another?

404
00:23:26,196 —> 00:23:28,265
The Buddhists would
call that liberation.

405
00:23:28,536 —> 00:23:33,166
It’s a kind of freedom that
no one else can give you,

406
00:23:33,166 —> 00:23:39,566
but allow us in some sense
to rotate in consciousness

407
00:23:39,566 —> 00:23:44,856
so that we — for one moment
we’re stepping outside of time.

408
00:23:46,426 —> 00:23:51,525
Because if you live
in the now, well,

409
00:23:51,526 —> 00:23:52,946
maybe you’ve had
this experience.

410
00:23:52,946 —> 00:23:56,626
Just check your watch and
take a look right now.

411
00:23:57,106 —> 00:23:57,996
What time is it?

412
00:23:58,186 —> 00:24:00,275
I’ll tell you what
time it is, it’s now.

413
00:24:01,146 —> 00:24:05,346
And every time you
check your watch

414
00:24:05,816 —> 00:24:09,916
or your phone, it’s now again.

415
00:24:13,736 —> 00:24:16,636
Now what — why am I
even talking about this?

416
00:24:17,346 —> 00:24:19,006
Why it I even come here?

417
00:24:19,536 —> 00:24:24,396
It’s always good to is it ask
those questions, you know,

418
00:24:24,736 —> 00:24:26,136
it’s like — I don’t
know, actually.

419
00:24:26,726 —> 00:24:28,956
Because it’s usually bigger

420
00:24:28,956 —> 00:24:31,856
than whatever you think
your reasons are [Inaudible]

421
00:24:32,626 —> 00:24:38,686
but it has a lot to do with
— with the medical schools

422
00:24:39,136 —> 00:24:43,196
and with what — what
Ira’s doing there.

423
00:24:44,386 —> 00:24:49,735
And with what Helen is doing
in the undergraduate school.

424
00:24:50,276 —> 00:24:54,586
It has to do with the fact that
the society has reached a point

425
00:24:54,986 —> 00:24:57,296
where we’re beginning
to understand

426
00:24:57,526 —> 00:25:01,786
that the exponentially
increasing levels of stress,

427
00:25:01,906 —> 00:25:06,056
in medicine, in our professional
lives, in our personal lives,

428
00:25:06,126 —> 00:25:15,526
at every age, really require
some kind of shift that is not

429
00:25:15,526 —> 00:25:17,866
in the form of taking
some pill to numb yourself

430
00:25:17,866 —> 00:25:19,636
out to it or get it together.

431
00:25:20,786 —> 00:25:25,296
But actually, we need to
cultivate what’s often spoken

432
00:25:25,296 —> 00:25:30,346
of as the domain of being in
order to not be so overwhelmed

433
00:25:30,346 —> 00:25:32,126
by the doing and the performing.

434
00:25:33,406 —> 00:25:37,025
And while it’s true that with
the Olympic team we were using

435
00:25:37,026 —> 00:25:40,296
mindfulness to actually
improve their performance,

436
00:25:40,566 —> 00:25:42,776
it was kind of a Zen operation,

437
00:25:43,176 —> 00:25:45,706
that you can’t improve
performance by trying

438
00:25:45,936 —> 00:25:48,745
to improve performance,
especially with the mind.

439
00:25:49,026 —> 00:25:51,686
Because the kind of
mind that’s grasping

440
00:25:51,686 —> 00:25:54,896
for an outcome is exactly
the kind of mind that gets

441
00:25:54,896 —> 00:25:56,985
in the way of any
desirable outcome.

442
00:25:58,106 —> 00:26:00,716
Have you got that, did you
catch that as it went by?

443
00:26:01,126 —> 00:26:03,846
Okay. So this means
we’re in new territory.

444
00:26:04,346 —> 00:26:05,896
One example, common example.

445
00:26:05,896 —> 00:26:07,926
You can’t get to sleep

446
00:26:08,376 —> 00:26:10,186
by forcing yourself
to get to sleep.

447
00:26:10,476 —> 00:26:13,026
By telling yourself how
important the meeting is you

448
00:26:13,026 —> 00:26:13,866
have tomorrow.

449
00:26:14,226 —> 00:26:17,826
In fact, that’s probably
a very bad idea,

450
00:26:18,946 —> 00:26:22,386
because that thought will
actually secrete one more

451
00:26:22,386 —> 00:26:26,706
thought, secrete one more
thought or the meeting

452
00:26:26,706 —> 00:26:28,146
or the stakes of it, or —

453
00:26:28,146 —> 00:26:30,726
and then that will
lead to something else

454
00:26:30,726 —> 00:26:34,316
in this default network of
mind wandering and pretty soon,

455
00:26:34,486 —> 00:26:38,146
you are wide awake, desperately
wanting to be asleep.

456
00:26:39,026 —> 00:26:42,476
And not knowing how
to get there.

457
00:26:42,656 —> 00:26:48,576
So it’s not trivial to
actually befriend our own minds

458
00:26:48,576 —> 00:26:53,006
and our own lives in such
a way we can actually work

459
00:26:53,006 —> 00:26:57,846
in these paradoxical ways
where striving won’t do it.

460
00:26:58,146 —> 00:26:59,146
Striving won’t do it.

461
00:26:59,376 —> 00:27:02,396
That doesn’t mean that I’m
advocating that all of us, like,

462
00:27:02,516 —> 00:27:06,406
abandon ambition or don’t
care about anything.

463
00:27:07,206 —> 00:27:09,666
Meditation is not
about becoming stupid.

464
00:27:10,226 —> 00:27:15,956
Not even being non judgmental
is not about becoming stupid.

465
00:27:16,426 —> 00:27:18,466
It’s sounds like, oh
don’t judge anything.

466
00:27:18,466 —> 00:27:20,656
Maybe I’ll just walk off
the stage and break my leg,

467
00:27:20,726 —> 00:27:23,936
you know, no, I’m aware the
edge of the stage is here.

468
00:27:24,256 —> 00:27:26,756
And if I do fall off the
stage and break my leg, yeah,

469
00:27:26,756 —> 00:27:29,866
that will have been a moment
of mindlessness or out

470
00:27:29,866 —> 00:27:31,466
of touch, if you will.

471
00:27:32,076 —> 00:27:35,776
But — walk across the street
without looking because,

472
00:27:36,086 —> 00:27:40,166
you know, we have to sense
we’re not going to judge

473
00:27:40,256 —> 00:27:41,846
that that judge that
truck coming at me —

474
00:27:43,566 —> 00:27:49,126
there’s a big difference between
judgment and discernment.

475
00:27:49,876 —> 00:27:52,356
So mindfulness is
all about discerning

476
00:27:53,066 —> 00:27:55,206
with clarity what’s
actually going on.

477
00:27:55,906 —> 00:27:58,126
Now most of time now,
how many of you would say

478
00:27:58,126 —> 00:28:00,706
that you are engaged
in some kind of a way

479
00:28:00,706 —> 00:28:04,265
that doesn’t feel
all that good a lot

480
00:28:04,266 —> 00:28:07,816
of the time in multitasking.

481
00:28:08,386 —> 00:28:10,156
Anybody find yourself
multitasking?

482
00:28:10,746 —> 00:28:11,866
Confess. That when you’re

483
00:28:11,866 —> 00:28:16,985
on the phone you’re
actually sending an e-mail

484
00:28:17,616 —> 00:28:18,396
to somebody else.

485
00:28:19,376 —> 00:28:20,956
Anybody ever do that?

486
00:28:20,956 —> 00:28:22,446
Raise your hands, I want to see.

487
00:28:22,446 —> 00:28:23,336
Confession time.

488
00:28:23,986 —> 00:28:26,466
Okay, and you know, we
actually do it a lot.

489
00:28:26,466 —> 00:28:31,495
Why? Part of it is really
because we’re so stressed.

490
00:28:31,916 —> 00:28:35,816
We don’t have enough moments
in our day to get it all done,

491
00:28:35,816 —> 00:28:38,226
so we like, start to
discombobulate a little bit,

492
00:28:38,226 —> 00:28:39,606
and juggle and cut corners.

493
00:28:40,096 —> 00:28:45,816
And there are wonderful studies
that that actually impede

494
00:28:45,816 —> 00:28:54,166
or reduces or — any kind of,
you know, objective measure

495
00:28:54,166 —> 00:28:59,245
of performance, that doing
two things at once detracts

496
00:28:59,316 —> 00:29:01,016
from the quality of either one.

497
00:29:01,276 —> 00:29:04,606
Doing five things at once
or being that scattered

498
00:29:04,606 —> 00:29:06,806
in your mind, you don’t even
have to be doing anything,

499
00:29:06,806 —> 00:29:09,236
but when you’re at
the mercy of this kind

500
00:29:09,236 —> 00:29:10,796
of mind wandering all the time.

501
00:29:11,126 —> 00:29:15,646
And you’re trying to get things
done is very, very challenging.

502
00:29:15,886 —> 00:29:16,866
Very challenging.

503
00:29:18,096 —> 00:29:21,256
So the question is, is
there a way to actually live

504
00:29:21,256 —> 00:29:28,116
that will allow us to deal
with what Zorba the Greek

505
00:29:28,116 —> 00:29:32,256
in Kasantzakis in the novel
says the full catastrophe

506
00:29:32,256 —> 00:29:35,246
of the human condition; the
good, the bad, the ugly,

507
00:29:35,246 —> 00:29:39,896
the unwanted , the feared,
the traumatic, the awful.

508
00:29:40,556 —> 00:29:45,506
And to be able to hold
each moment in its fullness

509
00:29:47,176 —> 00:29:51,436
and allow our attention faculty
and our awareness faculty

510
00:29:51,436 —> 00:29:55,346
to actually hold
it in such a way

511
00:29:55,346 —> 00:30:00,526
that we can then inhabit the
next moment with authenticity

512
00:30:00,686 —> 00:30:07,505
and maybe even respond
appropriately to this vast range

513
00:30:07,506 —> 00:30:09,996
of demands that we’re
faced with all the time.

514
00:30:10,336 —> 00:30:13,786
Now when I started the stress
reduction clinic back in —

515
00:30:13,886 —> 00:30:19,376
at University of
Massachusetts back in 1979,

516
00:30:21,546 —> 00:30:24,176
and I did bring some
slides, which I don’t know

517
00:30:24,176 —> 00:30:26,816
if I will show you, but I’ll
just sort of take that moment

518
00:30:26,816 —> 00:30:31,706
by moment, maybe I’ll show
them to you, maybe I won’t —

519
00:30:32,776 —> 00:30:36,346
because I’m trying to actually
create more of an impression.

520
00:30:36,346 —> 00:30:37,976
I don’t want to just
leave you with things

521
00:30:37,976 —> 00:30:39,906
in your head, just facts.

522
00:30:40,656 —> 00:30:44,396
Okay? Because you’ll
lose them immediately.

523
00:30:44,966 —> 00:30:48,805
Okay? Because other facts will
come in, and you know, whatever.

524
00:30:48,806 —> 00:30:54,136
If you spent time and energy
getting here and I’ve spent time

525
00:30:54,136 —> 00:30:55,036
and energy getting here,

526
00:30:55,036 —> 00:31:01,256
then what would make me feel
most satisfied is if one,

527
00:31:01,576 —> 00:31:03,986
you had some kind of
inkling why you came today.

528
00:31:05,166 —> 00:31:07,636
I’m sure you all do it, it’s
a mystery though, I’m sure.

529
00:31:08,566 —> 00:31:11,826
Hoping to maybe be
entertained or maybe connect

530
00:31:11,826 —> 00:31:14,976
on some deeper level or maybe
you practice mindfulness

531
00:31:14,976 —> 00:31:16,866
or maybe you’ve been to
a [Inaudible] program,

532
00:31:17,116 —> 00:31:22,186
but if you peel back all those
layers there’s some is really,

533
00:31:22,316 —> 00:31:22,756
really, really,

534
00:31:22,756 —> 00:31:24,376
really interesting
reason why you’re here.

535
00:31:24,886 —> 00:31:26,156
And I bet you don’t
know what it is.

536
00:31:27,446 —> 00:31:28,176
I’m not joking.

537
00:31:28,736 —> 00:31:32,346
Because there’s intelligences
at work that are just deeper

538
00:31:32,346 —> 00:31:33,656
than the thought function.

539
00:31:34,426 —> 00:31:37,226
And the thought function is
so smart that it sometimes

540
00:31:37,296 —> 00:31:39,466
out smarts us completely,
have you noticed that?

541
00:31:39,466 —> 00:31:41,226
And then it’s like we’re stupid.

542
00:31:41,806 —> 00:31:44,406
We’re so smart, we’re stupid.

543
00:31:45,456 —> 00:31:48,005
It’s very hard to see that in
yourself but you can see it

544
00:31:48,006 —> 00:31:49,556
in other people just
really easily.

545
00:31:49,556 —> 00:31:54,896
Have you — maybe
you’ve noticed that.

546
00:31:55,566 —> 00:31:58,466
So I’m going to try to weave
together a whole bunch of things

547
00:31:58,466 —> 00:32:02,255
that probably none of it is
going to make complete sense,

548
00:32:02,256 —> 00:32:04,736
but what I’m doing
here is I’m trying

549
00:32:04,736 —> 00:32:06,266
to in some sense plant seeds.

550
00:32:07,196 —> 00:32:11,356
I’m trying to plant seeds in
the fertile ground or garden

551
00:32:11,636 —> 00:32:14,606
of whatever it was that
brought you here so that

552
00:32:14,606 —> 00:32:18,106
when you leave here
something has been touched

553
00:32:18,326 —> 00:32:22,656
that will keep those seeds,
that actually I’m not planting,

554
00:32:22,826 —> 00:32:27,376
they are already in you, keep
them being watered nurtured,

555
00:32:27,376 —> 00:32:34,216
protected, privileged in a
certain way, so that it —

556
00:32:39,106 —> 00:32:48,226
nurtures in some profound sense
some aspect of you that wants

557
00:32:48,226 —> 00:32:54,976
to be as alive as you can be
while you have the chance.

558
00:32:57,636 —> 00:33:01,096
We say to people coming to
our stress reduction clinic,

559
00:33:01,586 —> 00:33:04,976
and they come with every
conceivable kind of ailment,

560
00:33:05,146 —> 00:33:08,616
referred by every conceivable
sub specialty and specialty,

561
00:33:08,846 —> 00:33:10,336
and generalist in medicine.

562
00:33:10,746 —> 00:33:14,136
And we say — and it’s an
eight week long course,

563
00:33:14,186 —> 00:33:17,186
designed to teach you how to
take better care of yourself

564
00:33:17,186 —> 00:33:19,525
as a compliment to whatever
the healthcare system is,

565
00:33:19,806 —> 00:33:21,516
I should call that a
disease care system

566
00:33:21,516 —> 00:33:22,826
by the way, can do with you.

567
00:33:23,976 —> 00:33:25,306
Can do for you.

568
00:33:29,196 —> 00:33:34,396
And we say to them from
our perspective as long

569
00:33:34,396 —> 00:33:37,796
as you’re breathing, there’s
more right with you than wrong

570
00:33:37,796 —> 00:33:41,496
with you, no matter
what’s wrong with you.

571
00:33:41,496 —> 00:33:42,946
No matter what’s wrong.

572
00:33:43,426 —> 00:33:48,816
And we see people you would
not want to be in their body

573
00:33:49,206 —> 00:33:50,755
or in their mind
or in their life.

574
00:33:51,896 —> 00:33:54,005
And they probably wouldn’t
want to be in yours either.

575
00:33:54,616 —> 00:33:58,996
But you probably wouldn’t
want to hear that.

576
00:33:59,456 —> 00:34:02,485
Because after all, you’re the
star of this movie, aren’t you?

577
00:34:02,726 —> 00:34:09,386
So — so that there’s more right
with you than wrong with you,

578
00:34:09,386 —> 00:34:10,585
no matter what’s wrong with you.

579
00:34:11,045 —> 00:34:17,045
That’s radical perspective
and very, very important.

580
00:34:17,045 —> 00:34:20,966
Because you know, I started the
stress reduction clinic in 1979.

581
00:34:20,966 —> 00:34:24,315
In 1979 the surgeon
general’s report came

582
00:34:24,315 —> 00:34:27,085
out Called Healthy People
and that it was saying,

583
00:34:27,386 —> 00:34:29,875
forecasting into the
future, which here now,

584
00:34:29,876 —> 00:34:33,386
we are in this future, that no
matter how much money America

585
00:34:33,386 —> 00:34:37,496
spends at throwing money
at health and healthcare,

586
00:34:37,755 —> 00:34:40,366
it will never be
enough to have health.

587
00:34:42,505 —> 00:34:46,386
Because there’s a missing
ingredient, and it’s the humans

588
00:34:46,386 —> 00:34:48,985
that healthcare is
supposed to care for.

589
00:34:50,056 —> 00:34:52,376
And that there’s not
enough money on the planet

590
00:34:53,025 —> 00:34:56,196
to do all the various things
that would have to be done

591
00:34:56,226 —> 00:34:58,776
with us when we don’t
take care of ourselves,

592
00:34:58,776 —> 00:35:02,636
when we don’t know how to handle
stress, when we do not know how

593
00:35:02,636 —> 00:35:07,166
to be in wise relationship with
ourselves and our lifestyle

594
00:35:07,166 —> 00:35:11,006
and our diet and exercise
and our bodies and aging

595
00:35:11,006 —> 00:35:14,466
and everything else, that if we
leave that all to the, you know,

596
00:35:14,506 —> 00:35:17,196
auto mechanics model of
medicine, drive your car

597
00:35:17,196 —> 00:35:20,546
around till it breaks down, then
you get the carburetor replaced

598
00:35:20,546 —> 00:35:22,995
or the engine or
whatever, the tires.

599
00:35:23,406 —> 00:35:27,096
But this is not a machine.

600
00:35:27,306 —> 00:35:29,776
I know a lot of people,
even in biology,

601
00:35:29,776 —> 00:35:35,426
love to use machine analogies
and even nano machine analogies

602
00:35:35,616 —> 00:35:37,846
about the body, and to a
degree they’re correct.

603
00:35:38,506 —> 00:35:39,856
But there’s another piece of it,

604
00:35:39,856 —> 00:35:41,896
like no one understands
the construction

605
00:35:41,896 —> 00:35:44,226
of the machine that’s you.

606
00:35:45,306 —> 00:35:46,426
I’ll give you one example.

607
00:35:47,746 —> 00:35:50,486
How many of you see
that slide up there,

608
00:35:50,486 —> 00:35:52,616
and what’s the color
of the background?

609
00:35:53,736 —> 00:35:55,826
Blue. Everybody agree
that it’s blue.

610
00:35:56,176 —> 00:35:58,686
No one knows how you do that.

611
00:35:59,756 —> 00:36:03,566
No one knowing how you
go from the wave length

612
00:36:03,856 —> 00:36:08,216
of electro magnetic radiation,
the blue region, okay,

613
00:36:08,216 —> 00:36:11,246
in the visible spectrum,
no one knowing how you go

614
00:36:11,246 —> 00:36:14,276
from this wave length, which
is colorless, it’s just energy,

615
00:36:14,616 —> 00:36:18,096
to a subjective feeling of blue.

616
00:36:19,096 —> 00:36:24,166
And we also really don’t know,
we have a consensus reality

617
00:36:24,196 —> 00:36:26,435
that agrees that the blue that
you’re seeing and the blue

618
00:36:26,436 —> 00:36:29,006
that I’m seeing are the same
blue, but it’s not always true,

619
00:36:29,006 —> 00:36:31,935
and it’s not true for colorblind
people, the blue-green color.

620
00:36:32,576 —> 00:36:35,896
Okay, so there’s a lot of kind
of consensus agreement here.

621
00:36:36,146 —> 00:36:40,346
But there’s — the brain weighs
approximately three pounds,

622
00:36:41,116 —> 00:36:41,486
okay?

623
00:36:41,736 —> 00:36:47,736
And it’s all cells and cables
that are part, you know,

624
00:36:47,736 —> 00:36:49,455
made up of cells, neurons.

625
00:36:49,456 —> 00:36:52,816
And then all these gluteal cells
in there supporting the neurons.

626
00:36:53,486 —> 00:36:55,816
And incredibly specialized.

627
00:36:55,816 —> 00:37:00,625
I mean, it’s really the most
complex assembly of matter

628
00:37:00,626 —> 00:37:02,696
in the known by us universe,

629
00:37:03,886 —> 00:37:06,136
right inside your
little old body.

630
00:37:06,886 —> 00:37:18,846
And no one knows how senses,
how consciousness, how knowing,

631
00:37:19,266 —> 00:37:23,576
how even thinking arises
in this three pounds

632
00:37:23,576 —> 00:37:25,456
of what some neuro
scientists call meat.

633
00:37:26,096 —> 00:37:28,756
It’s a little distasteful.

634
00:37:30,146 —> 00:37:32,836
But to just kind
of make it graphic,

635
00:37:34,196 —> 00:37:37,875
so if you for get every once
in a while walking around in —

636
00:37:38,636 —> 00:37:41,896
on the Dartmouth campus or in
Hanover or wherever you happen

637
00:37:41,896 —> 00:37:44,566
to live that you’re
a miraculous being.

638
00:37:47,966 —> 00:37:48,906
Well, okay.

639
00:37:48,906 —> 00:37:51,586
It’s just one more mind
wandering, you know?

640
00:37:51,786 —> 00:37:56,996
One more default sort of
not really being aware

641
00:37:57,366 —> 00:38:01,606
of how amazing it is that
you can see, for instance.

642
00:38:01,816 —> 00:38:02,506
That you can hear.

643
00:38:03,336 —> 00:38:04,375
That you can taste.

644
00:38:05,146 —> 00:38:07,626
How many of us eat food
and we don’t bother

645
00:38:07,626 —> 00:38:10,046
to taste it, we just devour it.

646
00:38:11,426 —> 00:38:13,336
Or we taste the idea
of the food.

647
00:38:14,716 —> 00:38:16,036
Yeah, that was really good.

648
00:38:16,036 —> 00:38:18,806
Yeah, but you didn’t
actually taste it.

649
00:38:19,496 —> 00:38:22,986
Have you ever had a
mindless hug from somebody

650
00:38:22,986 —> 00:38:25,526
who was really trying
to be friendly?

651
00:38:26,276 —> 00:38:33,176
Sort of impulse to be
friendly, but not in one’s body.

652
00:38:33,966 —> 00:38:36,586
Okay? So all of these
things we take for granted.

653
00:38:37,106 —> 00:38:41,556
But we can actually begin
a process of re-minding —

654
00:38:41,556 —> 00:38:42,986
and I put a little
hyphen in there —

655
00:38:43,086 —> 00:38:47,106
re-minding ourselves,
re-bodying ourselves.

656
00:38:47,356 —> 00:38:48,406
When? Now.

657
00:38:48,456 —> 00:38:51,206
Because this is the
only time you have.

658
00:38:52,306 —> 00:38:57,356
And coming back into a certain
kind of vector or alignment

659
00:38:57,706 —> 00:39:00,056
with the entire life trajectory,

660
00:39:00,056 —> 00:39:04,306
and it doesn’t matter
how old you are

661
00:39:05,636 —> 00:39:07,056
when you begin this process.

662
00:39:07,056 —> 00:39:11,016
The Native Americans,
actually, measured your age

663
00:39:11,016 —> 00:39:13,446
from when you became — they
started to measure your age

664
00:39:13,446 —> 00:39:15,846
from when you became
a grand parent.

665
00:39:16,596 —> 00:39:18,926
Before that, it was like
you were really too busy

666
00:39:18,926 —> 00:39:20,196
to be human.

667
00:39:21,706 —> 00:39:28,116
And the — and in the Asian
Indians, measure your age

668
00:39:28,116 —> 00:39:30,076
from when you start
practicing yoga.

669
00:39:30,076 —> 00:39:33,616
So if you’re 75 years old
and you’ve been into yoga

670
00:39:33,616 —> 00:39:36,306
for three months, you’re
three months old, I like that.

671
00:39:36,306 —> 00:39:36,896
Isn’t that nice?

672
00:39:38,156 —> 00:39:39,726
What about new beginning?

673
00:39:39,726 —> 00:39:41,836
Every moment a new beginning.

674
00:39:43,186 —> 00:39:45,376
That’s what mindfulness
is about.

675
00:39:46,186 —> 00:39:47,586
Every moment fresh.

676
00:39:49,046 —> 00:39:50,986
Now this is not a philosophy.

677
00:39:52,366 —> 00:39:54,526
It’s not a good idea,
it’s not a concept.

678
00:39:54,526 —> 00:39:55,676
It’s a way of being.

679
00:39:55,676 —> 00:39:56,706
It’s not a technique.

680
00:39:57,486 —> 00:39:59,786
It’s not a technique and
it’s not a special state.

681
00:39:59,926 —> 00:40:05,976
Oh, I think I’ll trot over
to the MBSR clinic, meditate.

682
00:40:06,516 —> 00:40:35,436
[ Background noise ]

683
00:40:35,936 —> 00:40:37,716
>> Maybe you’re waiting for
something else to happen.

684
00:40:37,716 —> 00:40:39,076
But nothing else happens.

685
00:40:40,866 —> 00:40:41,836
Nothing else happens.

686
00:40:41,936 —> 00:40:42,646
This is it.

687
00:40:42,646 —> 00:40:45,516
You know, good-bye.

688
00:40:49,316 —> 00:40:53,526
Maybe you’re hoping for
something special to happen.

689
00:40:54,906 —> 00:40:57,496
Some special meditative state.

690
00:40:58,246 —> 00:40:59,556
Some kind of vision.

691
00:41:00,696 —> 00:41:05,306
Some kind of alignment of
the, you know, spheres.

692
00:41:07,496 —> 00:41:11,686
Some special bolt of lightening
out of the blue to wake you up.

693
00:41:12,096 —> 00:41:14,816
It’s a mistake.

694
00:41:15,486 —> 00:41:20,136
A miss, hyphen, take,
on meditation.

695
00:41:20,136 —> 00:41:21,716
On mindfulness, on reality.

696
00:41:22,306 —> 00:41:25,896
Let’s just pretend, okay, why
don’t we just sit for a moment.

697
00:41:26,206 —> 00:41:27,366
Ah, you’re already sitting.

698
00:41:28,676 —> 00:41:30,206
You don’t even need
to shift your posture,

699
00:41:30,206 —> 00:41:32,096
although I see some
people getting ready.

700
00:41:32,096 —> 00:41:36,496
Okay, now we’re going
to get into it.

701
00:41:36,496 —> 00:41:38,266
It’s going to be
somewhat experiential.

702
00:41:38,266 —> 00:41:38,856
Thank God.

703
00:41:38,856 —> 00:41:39,776
He could talk forever.

704
00:41:42,986 —> 00:41:48,136
But you see, you know, you don’t
even have to shift your posture

705
00:41:48,216 —> 00:41:50,036
to be awake or to be aware.

706
00:41:50,656 —> 00:41:54,006
You could do it like this.

707
00:41:54,526 —> 00:41:56,265
And really be aware.

708
00:41:57,586 —> 00:42:01,256
And by the way, I
can’t see my hands.

709
00:42:02,376 —> 00:42:03,376
But I know where they are.

710
00:42:04,146 —> 00:42:04,746
How do I know?

711
00:42:05,706 —> 00:42:08,476
A sense called proprioception.

712
00:42:09,386 —> 00:42:10,846
Maybe you’ve heard of
it, maybe you haven’t.

713
00:42:11,066 —> 00:42:12,676
But there are a lot
more than five senses,

714
00:42:12,676 —> 00:42:14,296
I just want to put
that out, okay?

715
00:42:14,696 —> 00:42:17,875
When we’re talking about
miraculous being or genius,

716
00:42:18,236 —> 00:42:21,016
it’s got lots of
different dimensions to it.

717
00:42:21,236 —> 00:42:25,106
Many. If I ask you how are you

718
00:42:25,106 —> 00:42:26,506
in the elevator and
you say fine.

719
00:42:27,786 —> 00:42:28,426
How do you know?

720
00:42:28,616 —> 00:42:31,516
Aside from the fact that you’re
not fine but you just don’t want

721
00:42:31,516 —> 00:42:32,486
to go into it in the elevator,

722
00:42:33,506 —> 00:42:35,316
with somebody you don’t
want to tell anyway.

723
00:42:36,776 —> 00:42:39,576
But when, you know, you’re
sort of — someone —

724
00:42:39,576 —> 00:42:42,286
a friend asks you how our and
you say fine, how do you know?

725
00:42:43,146 —> 00:42:44,136
That’s another sense.

726
00:42:44,626 —> 00:42:46,876
And you know very quickly.

727
00:42:47,096 —> 00:42:48,346
And you know when
you’re not, too.

728
00:42:48,856 —> 00:42:50,096
What is that knowing called?

729
00:42:50,096 —> 00:42:52,146
It’s not called well,
let me think.

730
00:42:52,146 —> 00:42:54,456
I don’t know.

731
00:42:54,456 —> 00:42:58,096
How am I. No, you
know instantly.

732
00:42:58,876 —> 00:43:00,726
That sense is called
interoception.

733
00:43:01,566 —> 00:43:06,326
There are ways that the organism
has, you know, using the brain

734
00:43:06,326 —> 00:43:09,096
and nervous system,
which has lots of maps,

735
00:43:09,146 —> 00:43:12,006
by the way the brain is
loaded with maps of the body.

736
00:43:12,766 —> 00:43:14,046
Loaded with maps of the body.

737
00:43:14,196 —> 00:43:16,706
And not just the
somatosensory cortises.

738
00:43:17,486 —> 00:43:22,216
But the insula and the
cerebellum and the, you know,

739
00:43:22,216 —> 00:43:27,616
the hippocampus, I mean, lots
and lots — and again I stress,

740
00:43:27,726 —> 00:43:29,996
we’re beginning to understand
something about what lights

741
00:43:29,996 —> 00:43:34,066
up when, when you meditate,
when you do this and do that,

742
00:43:34,066 —> 00:43:35,656
when you go into depression.

743
00:43:37,156 —> 00:43:39,386
All sorts of wonderful,
wonderful things happening.

744
00:43:39,626 —> 00:43:41,516
Brain research in
neuro science nowadays.

745
00:43:41,996 —> 00:43:44,576
But still, no one knowing
how it comes together.

746
00:43:45,256 —> 00:43:49,016
In you, in this moment, in a way

747
00:43:49,016 —> 00:43:51,396
that actually you don’t
have to think about.

748
00:43:52,526 —> 00:43:55,165
And even if there’s something
going on, even if you’re in,

749
00:43:55,166 —> 00:43:58,016
say, pain from your lower
back and you’ve had it

750
00:43:58,016 —> 00:44:02,016
for a long time, or even if
you have cancer at the moment

751
00:44:02,016 —> 00:44:05,136
or you’re a cancer
survivor or whatever it is.

752
00:44:05,466 —> 00:44:08,276
Or you have, you
know, heart, you know,

753
00:44:08,276 —> 00:44:09,586
issues of one kind or another.

754
00:44:09,586 —> 00:44:11,325
Whatever it is.

755
00:44:14,686 —> 00:44:17,686
The sum total of
this universe, of —

756
00:44:18,866 —> 00:44:21,846
between 10 and 100
trillion cells,

757
00:44:22,196 —> 00:44:25,446
the whole body now
we’re talking about.

758
00:44:25,896 —> 00:44:28,366
Is good enough to have
gotten you here today.

759
00:44:29,386 —> 00:44:31,726
Hmm? It’s good enough for now.

760
00:44:33,026 —> 00:44:35,536
And the more energy
you pour into it,

761
00:44:35,536 —> 00:44:38,096
the more that robustness,
whatever it is,

762
00:44:38,096 —> 00:44:39,566
sometimes called homeostasis,

763
00:44:39,596 —> 00:44:42,296
but it’s a very dynamical
process that we call health,

764
00:44:43,256 —> 00:44:46,106
as opposed to disease
or dis-ease.

765
00:44:46,606 —> 00:44:50,816
When we start to pour attention,
energy in the form of attention

766
00:44:50,816 —> 00:44:52,625
into what’s already
right with us,

767
00:44:52,906 —> 00:44:55,566
it turns out that the body
has its ear to the rail,

768
00:44:55,736 —> 00:44:58,406
the brain has its ear to
the rail, the brain is part

769
00:44:58,406 —> 00:45:05,236
of the rail, the —
the heart, every aspect

770
00:45:05,236 —> 00:45:08,696
of our being is one
integrated whole.

771
00:45:10,126 —> 00:45:12,686
It’s not like different systems.

772
00:45:12,826 —> 00:45:15,856
The immune system talks
to the nervous system.

773
00:45:15,856 —> 00:45:18,046
And the nervous system
talks right back.

774
00:45:20,716 —> 00:45:23,435
And everybody else is listening
in on the conversation.

775
00:45:23,566 —> 00:45:24,725
And it’s all cells.

776
00:45:24,726 —> 00:45:27,096
And if you took your liver
— if we all took our livers

777
00:45:27,096 —> 00:45:28,516
and put them out
on the stage here,

778
00:45:28,726 —> 00:45:30,346
that would be an
interesting exercise,

779
00:45:30,726 —> 00:45:35,086
and then we shuffled them around
and then you were all encouraged

780
00:45:35,086 —> 00:45:36,716
to just pick yours
up on the way out.

781
00:45:37,206 —> 00:45:38,646
You wouldn’t know
which was yours.

782
00:45:39,356 —> 00:45:42,316
You can look at all hundred
trillion of these cells

783
00:45:42,316 —> 00:45:45,245
in your body, and your
name isn’t on any of it.

784
00:45:45,736 —> 00:45:47,246
It’s like, oh, here’s my liver.

785
00:45:49,056 —> 00:45:50,366
Here’s my gal bladder.

786
00:45:54,156 —> 00:45:57,436
The punctuation from the cell
phones is actually really —

787
00:45:57,436 —> 00:45:59,576
if that was a cell phone
— is really interesting.

788
00:46:00,096 —> 00:46:01,746
But do you hear what I’m saying?

789
00:46:01,746 —> 00:46:05,686
Even the question of who
we are, when you start

790
00:46:05,686 —> 00:46:11,906
to actually ask it with
tremendous authenticity,

791
00:46:12,256 —> 00:46:21,966
it might not be so feasible
to just say your name

792
00:46:23,376 —> 00:46:27,636
or even describe what you
do, or even send in your CV.

793
00:46:27,636 —> 00:46:28,856
If you’ve ever hired people,

794
00:46:28,856 —> 00:46:30,506
you know that the
CV is not the person

795
00:46:30,506 —> 00:46:32,665
and you hire the CV
a lot of the time.

796
00:46:33,016 —> 00:46:33,646
Big mistake.

797
00:46:35,566 —> 00:46:39,926
Because you can’t work with
the person a lot of the time.

798
00:46:40,436 —> 00:46:43,796
What you want it congruence,
you want integration.

799
00:46:44,136 —> 00:46:46,716
So when we take our
seats, so to speak,

800
00:46:47,306 —> 00:46:52,956
what we’re actually
engaging in, is a recognition

801
00:46:53,346 —> 00:46:55,276
of how integrated
we already are.

802
00:46:55,386 —> 00:46:57,216
We don’t need to,
oh, I’m such a wreck,

803
00:46:57,216 —> 00:46:58,395
I’ve got to get integrated.

804
00:46:58,626 —> 00:47:01,986
No, from this perspective
you are already as integrated

805
00:47:01,986 —> 00:47:03,446
as you’re going to
be in this moment.

806
00:47:04,356 —> 00:47:05,336
Is it enough?

807
00:47:05,336 —> 00:47:06,265
Is it good enough?

808
00:47:07,126 —> 00:47:08,546
So let’s actually take a moment.

809
00:47:08,546 —> 00:47:10,986
I’ve even brought another prop.

810
00:47:10,986 —> 00:47:11,986
I brought some bells.

811
00:47:14,306 —> 00:47:17,106
We don’t need the bells.

812
00:47:17,836 —> 00:47:18,645
But I’ll ring them.

813
00:47:19,506 —> 00:47:21,546
And when I ring them
— why don’t —

814
00:47:21,756 —> 00:47:24,106
just for fun, you don’t
have to shift your posture,

815
00:47:24,156 —> 00:47:28,806
but just for fun, why don’t
you shift your posture and sit

816
00:47:28,806 —> 00:47:32,616
in a posture that for
now embodies dignity,

817
00:47:32,616 —> 00:47:33,616
whatever that means for you.

818
00:47:34,966 —> 00:47:36,546
Look, the entire room is moving.

819
00:47:40,426 —> 00:47:43,356
Not that dignified, I guess.

820
00:47:43,356 —> 00:47:45,056
All right, but actually
it doesn’t matter.

821
00:47:45,056 —> 00:47:46,466
The posture is secondary.

822
00:47:46,936 —> 00:47:49,426
What’s important is
the inner orientation.

823
00:47:49,876 —> 00:47:53,356
The willingness to open
to the present moment,

824
00:47:53,356 —> 00:47:55,876
to put out the welcome
mat and to get —

825
00:47:55,876 —> 00:47:58,636
and to let the idea
that oh, now we’re going

826
00:47:58,636 —> 00:48:00,666
to do something special, drop.

827
00:48:01,656 —> 00:48:05,566
Because as soon as you sort of
plant that seed, now we’re going

828
00:48:05,566 —> 00:48:06,705
to do something special

829
00:48:06,706 —> 00:48:08,726
and we’re going experience
something special,

830
00:48:09,066 —> 00:48:11,455
then you’ll be on the look
out for something special.

831
00:48:12,946 —> 00:48:15,036
But you see, nothing special.

832
00:48:15,036 —> 00:48:17,126
There’s a wonderful
cartoon in the New Yorker

833
00:48:17,126 —> 00:48:20,826
that I actually mentioned
a long time ago

834
00:48:20,826 —> 00:48:25,336
in Wherever You Go There You
Are, two Zen monks, you know,

835
00:48:25,566 —> 00:48:29,685
one obviously elder,
the other young.

836
00:48:30,146 —> 00:48:33,196
And the young one’s looking up
quizzically at the older one.

837
00:48:33,666 —> 00:48:35,926
And the caption underneath,

838
00:48:35,976 —> 00:48:38,666
the old one’s speaking,
nothing happens next.

839
00:48:38,786 —> 00:48:40,286
This is it.

840
00:48:40,316 —> 00:48:41,756
I just said that to you earlier.

841
00:48:42,386 —> 00:48:46,456
But the this is it,
is really important.

842
00:48:46,456 —> 00:48:49,186
Otherwise, you could spend
20 or 30 years or more,

843
00:48:49,386 —> 00:48:52,356
and people do this, meditating,
trying to get some place else.

844
00:48:52,766 —> 00:48:56,216
Trying to have some
special experience.

845
00:48:56,486 —> 00:48:57,496
That’s what it’s all about.

846
00:48:57,496 —> 00:48:58,396
Now I’m enlightened.

847
00:48:59,236 —> 00:49:00,996
The problem is you’re
already enlightened.

848
00:49:01,536 —> 00:49:04,156
But the personal pronoun
that wants to grab it

849
00:49:04,586 —> 00:49:06,336
and say I’m enlightened,

850
00:49:06,626 —> 00:49:08,616
it’s the personal pronoun
that’s the problem,

851
00:49:08,616 —> 00:49:09,526
not the enlightenment.

852
00:49:10,846 —> 00:49:12,286
Your eyes are already
enlightened.

853
00:49:12,376 —> 00:49:15,856
Your ears are already
enlightened.

854
00:49:15,856 —> 00:49:18,296
Your feet actually do
what they’re supposed

855
00:49:18,336 —> 00:49:19,325
to do for the most part.

856
00:49:20,276 —> 00:49:23,006
Your brain is doing
what it’s supposed to.

857
00:49:23,006 —> 00:49:24,946
Your liver is doing what
it’s supposed to do.

858
00:49:25,466 —> 00:49:27,316
Very famous scientist

859
00:49:27,856 —> 00:49:32,826
and physician named Lewis
Thomas once said he’d rather be

860
00:49:32,826 —> 00:49:36,566
at the controls of
a 747 trying to land

861
00:49:36,876 —> 00:49:40,456
with no pilot training
whatsoever than at the controls

862
00:49:40,456 —> 00:49:44,286
of his own liver for 30 seconds.

863
00:49:47,146 —> 00:49:48,846
So you don’t need
to find special.

864
00:49:49,626 —> 00:49:51,736
This is good enough, okay?

865
00:49:51,986 —> 00:49:55,455
So let’s actually sit for a
moment, if you’re sitting,

866
00:49:55,456 —> 00:49:58,856
or stand if you’re standing,
in a posture that for you

867
00:49:58,856 —> 00:50:02,036
at this moment embodies
wakefulness and dignity.

868
00:50:02,036 —> 00:50:06,256
You don’t even have
to close your eyes.

869
00:50:06,886 —> 00:50:11,906
But you can if you like, or let
them fall unfocused on the chair

870
00:50:11,906 —> 00:50:13,056
in front of you or whatever.

871
00:50:18,166 —> 00:50:21,336
And as I ring the bell, seeing
if you can just follow the sound

872
00:50:21,336 —> 00:50:29,395
of the bells into
the space of the air.

873
00:50:30,516 —> 00:50:59,516
[ Bell ringing ]

874
00:51:00,016 —> 00:51:09,000
[ Background noise ]

875
00:51:09,546 —> 00:51:17,326
>> And allowing the space of
the air to be co-extensive

876
00:51:19,526 —> 00:51:25,185
with the space, you could
call it, of awareness.

877
00:51:28,716 —> 00:51:30,406
So that there’s simply
awareness.

878
00:51:36,396 —> 00:51:38,156
Hearing what’s here,
to be heard.

879
00:51:39,686 —> 00:51:47,876
The sound of the bells are past,
and now there’s just sound.

880
00:51:50,136 —> 00:51:51,056
Whatever’s arising.

881
00:51:55,006 —> 00:51:58,586
And you could feature
hearing as a way

882
00:51:58,586 —> 00:52:00,435
of anchoring our attention.

883
00:52:00,916 —> 00:52:03,626
You can focus on
some object like —

884
00:52:04,906 —> 00:52:06,806
or field of objects,
like hearing.

885
00:52:07,416 —> 00:52:16,356
And just rest in being aware
of sounds and the stillness,

886
00:52:17,146 —> 00:52:23,006
the silence in between,
inside, and underneath.

887
00:52:24,136 —> 00:52:48,446
Any and all sounds,
including, of course, my voice.

888
00:52:48,656 —> 00:52:51,616
Alternatively, because there’s
more than one thing going on,

889
00:52:51,616 —> 00:52:54,466
there’s not just hearing
going on, there’s also seeing

890
00:52:54,466 —> 00:52:56,205
and smelling and you know,

891
00:52:56,206 —> 00:52:59,436
all the senses are
actually operating.

892
00:52:59,436 —> 00:53:02,526
Seeing if you can actually
instead of hearing,

893
00:53:02,746 —> 00:53:07,666
feature for now a feeling,
a sense of the breath moving

894
00:53:07,666 —> 00:53:08,656
in and out of your body.

895
00:53:09,376 —> 00:53:11,356
Wherever it’s most
vivid in the body.

896
00:53:16,456 —> 00:53:20,016
Just allowing awareness to
inhabit the whole of the body

897
00:53:20,866 —> 00:53:24,846
and be most vivid in the region

898
00:53:25,176 —> 00:53:29,875
where the breath sensations
are arising and passing away.

899
00:53:31,346 —> 00:53:32,486
In breath.

900
00:53:33,746 —> 00:53:33,926
Up.

901
00:53:38,516 —> 00:53:47,546
[ Background noise ]

902
00:53:48,046 —> 00:53:50,386
>> And seeing if you can ride
on the waves of the breath

903
00:53:51,046 —> 00:53:55,245
with full awareness,
moment by moment by moment.

904
00:53:55,776 —> 00:54:04,336
And noticing any time the mind
goes off and gets involved

905
00:54:04,336 —> 00:54:07,435
in anything else, including
judging how stupid this is.

906
00:54:07,516 —> 00:54:08,926
We came for a talk and all

907
00:54:08,926 —> 00:54:11,806
of a sudden we’re doing
this stupid exercise.

908
00:54:15,096 —> 00:54:17,366
Whatever is flitting through
the mind at the moment,

909
00:54:17,366 —> 00:54:20,356
just making it so spacious

910
00:54:20,456 —> 00:54:25,836
that you can see whatever’s
unfolding, hear my guidance

911
00:54:25,836 —> 00:54:29,596
as I’m speaking, and at the
same time ride on the wave

912
00:54:29,666 —> 00:54:33,806
of the breath coming in,
and the breath going out.

913
00:54:34,656 —> 00:54:35,976
With full awareness.

914
00:54:36,466 —> 00:54:40,366
And a kind of interest,
the kind of, in some sense,

915
00:54:40,366 —> 00:54:42,086
affectionate attention.

916
00:54:42,386 —> 00:54:46,836
Even if the breath isn’t all
that interesting to you or all

917
00:54:46,836 —> 00:54:51,145
that boring, or your mind
says okay, I get that concept.

918
00:54:51,146 —> 00:54:51,756
What else.

919
00:54:52,076 —> 00:54:54,636
Just staying with the breath.

920
00:55:00,076 —> 00:55:02,186
And then playing
with the possibility

921
00:55:02,186 —> 00:55:05,116
of expanding the field of
awareness around the breath,

922
00:55:05,226 —> 00:55:08,506
wherever you’re experiencing
it most in the body

923
00:55:08,756 —> 00:55:12,696
until it includes a sense of the
body as a whole, sitting here

924
00:55:12,886 —> 00:55:14,346
or standing here, breathing.

925
00:55:14,906 —> 00:55:21,756
And noticing you can do
that just easy as pie.

926
00:55:21,836 —> 00:55:24,165
It’s not really a
doing, but when I say it,

927
00:55:24,166 —> 00:55:26,256
you can easily be —

928
00:55:26,256 —> 00:55:30,526
the awareness can hold the whole
body to one degree or another.

929
00:55:31,756 —> 00:55:34,225
And whatever degree you
can hold it, that’s fine.

930
00:55:34,716 —> 00:55:35,566
It’s not like, oh,

931
00:55:35,826 —> 00:55:37,766
if I practiced I’d
get better at this.

932
00:55:38,176 —> 00:55:40,086
That’s just the thought,
never mind.

933
00:55:41,356 —> 00:55:43,066
Just letting the
thoughts come and go,

934
00:55:43,066 —> 00:55:46,245
and staying with the awareness
of the body as a whole,

935
00:55:46,246 —> 00:55:47,046
sitting and breathing.

936
00:55:55,976 —> 00:55:57,636
And if possible, remembering

937
00:55:57,636 —> 00:56:00,646
that this isn’t some simple
little exercise that we’re doing

938
00:56:00,646 —> 00:56:01,726
in the middle of a talk.

939
00:56:02,756 —> 00:56:05,986
That this is your life
unfolding in this very moment.

940
00:56:06,846 —> 00:56:08,566
And this breath is
important to you.

941
00:56:10,056 —> 00:56:19,026
You wouldn’t want
to do without it.

942
00:56:19,216 —> 00:56:22,286
So with that kind of quality
of attending, that it’s not —

943
00:56:23,286 —> 00:56:27,216
it’s not really — it’s
like tuning a guitar string.

944
00:56:27,216 —> 00:56:32,395
You know, too lose,
two-tone, too tight.

945
00:56:32,396 —> 00:56:42,336
You know, two-tone, but if you
can just bring the lightest

946
00:56:42,336 —> 00:56:45,285
of touches, the lightest
of touches of awareness

947
00:56:45,286 —> 00:56:47,846
to the sense of the body
as a whole, breathing.

948
00:56:47,896 —> 00:56:51,216
As if it mattered.

949
00:56:51,576 —> 00:56:54,316
And of course it does.

950
00:56:54,486 —> 00:56:56,346
Because it’s your
body in this moment.

951
00:56:56,346 —> 00:56:59,246
It’s your life and
the breath is vital.

952
00:56:59,826 —> 00:57:03,216
And then one more before we end.

953
00:57:03,216 —> 00:57:08,216
Noticing any thoughts that may
be moving through your mind,

954
00:57:08,346 —> 00:57:10,756
and noticing how easy
it is to self-distracts,

955
00:57:10,856 —> 00:57:12,046
that the mind does wander.

956
00:57:12,536 —> 00:57:15,036
That it wanders away from
the breath, if we did this

957
00:57:15,036 —> 00:57:16,006
for any period of time.

958
00:57:16,566 —> 00:57:19,015
Sooner or later your mind
would be someplace else.

959
00:57:19,296 —> 00:57:22,665
Probably not even in the room.

960
00:57:22,666 —> 00:57:24,406
Maybe not even in
the present moment.

961
00:57:25,026 —> 00:57:28,875
Maybe having dinner in Paris.

962
00:57:29,726 —> 00:57:34,176
Or Bangkok, or in an
argument three years ago.

963
00:57:34,966 —> 00:57:36,915
In the shower with yourself.

964
00:57:38,296 —> 00:57:42,986
So when you notice the mind has
self distracted, no problem,

965
00:57:42,986 —> 00:57:45,516
no judging, just —
or if you judge it,

966
00:57:45,516 —> 00:57:48,986
don’t judge the judging, and
just see if you can come back

967
00:57:49,196 —> 00:57:50,636
to this moment in awareness.

968
00:57:50,826 —> 00:57:53,806
Featuring whatever object
of attention you care to.

969
00:57:53,886 —> 00:57:57,226
It could be anything that’s
in the field of awareness.

970
00:57:58,406 —> 00:58:03,116
But the last little piece
to just underscore that none

971
00:58:03,116 —> 00:58:05,746
of this is about the
sound of the bells.

972
00:58:06,156 —> 00:58:08,556
None of this is about
the feeling

973
00:58:08,556 —> 00:58:09,646
of the breath in the body.

974
00:58:10,096 —> 00:58:12,436
None of this is about
the thoughts moving

975
00:58:12,436 —> 00:58:13,106
through the mind.

976
00:58:13,426 —> 00:58:15,766
Those are all important
and they’re secondary,

977
00:58:15,766 —> 00:58:17,906
but what it’s really
about is the awareness

978
00:58:17,946 —> 00:58:22,986
that knows the sound when it
comes to the ears that knows —

979
00:58:23,416 —> 00:58:26,616
and I mean non conceptually
knows, not just conceptually —

980
00:58:27,036 —> 00:58:30,396
knows the feeling of the
breath moving in the body.

981
00:58:30,586 —> 00:58:35,915
Non conceptually inhabits the
body as a whole, in awareness,

982
00:58:35,916 —> 00:58:37,496
sitting and breathing.

983
00:58:38,236 —> 00:58:41,955
Non conceptually knows when
the mind self distracts,

984
00:58:42,296 —> 00:58:45,756
or we get into an emotional
whirl pool or turbulence

985
00:58:45,756 —> 00:58:46,576
of some kind or another.

986
00:58:46,846 —> 00:58:49,606
And the awareness can just,
like allow it to just be here.

987
00:58:49,786 —> 00:58:52,506
Feature it center stage,
let it calm, let it go,

988
00:58:52,876 —> 00:58:55,446
and meanwhile we just
continue to rest.

989
00:58:56,156 —> 00:58:58,336
To rest in awareness.

990
00:58:58,856 —> 00:59:03,826
Outside of time, because the
present moment is time —

991
00:59:04,536 —> 00:59:08,326
timeless in some profound way.

992
00:59:09,516 —> 00:59:20,546
[ Background noise ]

993
00:59:21,046 —> 00:59:24,906
>> And awareness and silence and
stillness are all different ways

994
00:59:24,906 —> 00:59:25,895
of saying the same thing.

995
00:59:26,546 —> 00:59:29,225
Of pointing to something
that’s already yours,

996
00:59:29,416 —> 00:59:32,996
that you don’t have to get.

997
00:59:33,156 —> 00:59:35,895
But has tremendous
healing potential.

998
00:59:37,976 —> 00:59:40,496
Tremendous potential
for learning.

999
00:59:41,956 —> 00:59:45,166
For seeing things in new
ways for that rotation

1000
00:59:45,166 —> 00:59:46,966
in consciousness that
I was speaking of.

1001
00:59:46,966 —> 00:59:49,676
Everything’s the same,
only nothing’s the same.

1002
00:59:49,676 —> 00:59:52,875
Why? Because you showed
up in your fullness.

1003
00:59:59,256 —> 01:00:00,326
So learning.

1004
01:00:00,936 —> 01:00:02,496
And out of that learning,
growing.

1005
01:00:03,236 —> 01:00:06,975
And out of that growing,
healing, which in my vocabulary,

1006
01:00:07,416 —> 01:00:09,996
the way I define healing
is coming to terms

1007
01:00:10,456 —> 01:00:11,516
with things as they are.

1008
01:00:12,546 —> 01:00:14,596
Coming to terms with
thing as they are.

1009
01:00:14,596 —> 01:00:15,856
Very different from curing.

1010
01:00:16,416 —> 01:00:21,116
There are very few cures in
medicine, but the opportunity

1011
01:00:21,116 —> 01:00:23,516
for healing as long
as there’s breath,

1012
01:00:24,776 —> 01:00:26,756
it’s in some sense already here.

1013
01:00:26,756 —> 01:00:31,366
All we need to do is see
it, feel it, live it.

1014
01:00:32,886 —> 01:00:35,866
And it’s not about
denying pain and suffering.

1015
01:00:35,866 —> 01:00:40,086
It’s about, in some sense,
befriending even that.

1016
01:00:42,126 —> 01:00:44,786
So resting for a final
few moments in stillness,

1017
01:00:44,986 —> 01:00:52,116
in silence, full wakefulness, in
full awareness, outside of time,

1018
01:00:52,516 —> 01:00:56,556
as if you had nothing
to do, no place to go.

1019
01:00:56,556 —> 01:00:57,526
Nothing to do.

1020
01:00:58,226 —> 01:00:59,546
And nothing to attain.

1021
01:01:00,046 —> 01:01:03,705
Because you’re already whole.

1022
01:01:04,336 —> 01:01:09,435
The meaning, by the way, of
the words health and healing,

1023
01:01:09,436 —> 01:01:12,386
and even the word
holy , H-O-L-Y.

1024
01:01:16,756 —> 01:01:19,145
And by the same token,
the word medicine

1025
01:01:19,146 —> 01:01:25,156
and the word meditation, they
grow out of the same tree.

1026
01:01:25,756 —> 01:01:28,806
The same root, Indo-European
root.

1027
01:01:30,796 —> 01:01:36,946
Medicine and meditation
are joined at the hip.

1028
01:01:39,606 —> 01:01:43,186
It’s not so radical to
actually bring them together

1029
01:01:43,186 —> 01:01:45,906
in main stream, clinical care.

1030
01:01:46,386 —> 01:01:49,796
In fact, it’s essential
for caring.

1031
01:01:57,076 —> 01:02:00,066
So silent, wakefulness.

1032
01:02:05,316 —> 01:02:07,625
Attending to what is.

1033
01:02:10,516 —> 01:02:26,516
[ Background noise ]

1034
01:02:27,016 —> 01:02:52,000
[ Bell ringing ]

1035
01:02:57,746 —> 01:03:07,876
>> Somehow the real
meditation practice never stops.

1036
01:03:08,966 —> 01:03:10,596
Just because some
bell as got rung.

1037
01:03:11,626 —> 01:03:15,266
Just because we’re going to
shift gears a little bit.

1038
01:03:16,176 —> 01:03:19,516
The real meditation is how you
live your life moment to moment.

1039
01:03:20,126 —> 01:03:22,716
It’s not how good you are
sitting without moving.

1040
01:03:24,216 —> 01:03:26,796
Or what great yoga poses you do.

1041
01:03:26,966 —> 01:03:29,346
Because yoga is itself
a meditation.

1042
01:03:29,496 —> 01:03:32,996
A beautiful form of
meditation we use enormously

1043
01:03:32,996 —> 01:03:36,636
and to do good purpose in MBSR,

1044
01:03:36,636 —> 01:03:38,166
mindfulness-based
stress reduction.

1045
01:03:41,876 —> 01:03:47,206
I’d like to just say a few
things about stress and medicine

1046
01:03:47,506 —> 01:03:49,006
and then we’ll open it up to —

1047
01:03:49,286 —> 01:03:53,886
and give you a little bit of
an expanse of how we work.

1048
01:03:53,886 —> 01:03:56,326
But I want you to have at
least this taste of it,

1049
01:03:56,636 —> 01:03:58,776
and I want to share a
couple of poems with you.

1050
01:03:59,266 —> 01:04:00,356
And it’s not like all

1051
01:04:00,356 —> 01:04:02,626
of a sudden we’ve
gotten a little weird,

1052
01:04:02,626 —> 01:04:04,316
I’m going a little weird on you.

1053
01:04:04,936 —> 01:04:08,766
How many of you when you hear
the word poetry or poems,

1054
01:04:09,006 —> 01:04:10,236
you go yeah, I don’t know.

1055
01:04:10,236 —> 01:04:11,196
Not a poem!

1056
01:04:11,426 —> 01:04:14,476
It’s like I don’t
understand those things.

1057
01:04:14,816 —> 01:04:18,196
That’s not uncommon.

1058
01:04:18,316 —> 01:04:24,415
But — but one of my colleagues,
John Tisdale, with whom I wrote

1059
01:04:24,416 —> 01:04:26,226
that book, The Mindful
Way Through Depression,

1060
01:04:27,006 —> 01:04:30,915
who is like one of the world’s
great cognitive scientists,

1061
01:04:31,296 —> 01:04:36,395
is coming out with a — several
papers, in which he’s arguing

1062
01:04:36,826 —> 01:04:39,786
that the root cause of suffering

1063
01:04:39,786 —> 01:04:45,966
in human beings is not knowing
how to deal with our emotions

1064
01:04:48,096 —> 01:04:51,796
because we don’t
know how to inhabit

1065
01:04:52,246 —> 01:04:53,966
and then shift our relationship

1066
01:04:53,966 —> 01:04:56,516
to what he calls
implicational meaning.

1067
01:04:57,486 —> 01:05:04,705
Implicational meaning is what
moves, say, in poetry, okay?

1068
01:05:05,316 —> 01:05:07,716
It’s different from the
propositional meaning,

1069
01:05:07,716 —> 01:05:13,676
which is just the
kind of bear facts.

1070
01:05:13,676 —> 01:05:16,156
Okay? So if I — I’ll
recite a poem for you.

1071
01:05:16,316 —> 01:05:19,145
This is a poem by
Antonio Muchato,

1072
01:05:19,146 —> 01:05:23,316
who’s a great Spanish
poet of the turn

1073
01:05:23,316 —> 01:05:25,455
of the 19th, 20th century.

1074
01:05:25,456 —> 01:05:27,506
And won the Nobel Prize.

1075
01:05:28,456 —> 01:05:29,106
It’s very short.

1076
01:05:30,096 —> 01:05:31,556
But see if you can feel it.

1077
01:05:32,336 —> 01:05:35,836
The wind one brilliant
day called to my soul

1078
01:05:35,836 —> 01:05:37,566
with an odor of jasmine.

1079
01:05:38,176 —> 01:05:43,256
The wind one brilliant
day called to my soul

1080
01:05:43,966 —> 01:05:45,395
with an odor of jasmine.

1081
01:05:46,736 —> 01:05:48,906
In exchange for the
odor of my jasmine,

1082
01:05:49,116 —> 01:05:51,616
I would like the
odor of your Roses.

1083
01:05:53,746 —> 01:05:54,876
I have no roses.

1084
01:05:55,936 —> 01:05:58,796
All the flowers in
my garden are dead.

1085
01:06:00,256 —> 01:06:00,866
Can you feel that?

1086
01:06:01,776 —> 01:06:03,796
I — how many times have we had

1087
01:06:03,796 —> 01:06:06,156
that feeling or a
similar feeling.

1088
01:06:06,156 —> 01:06:07,556
I have no roses.

1089
01:06:07,606 —> 01:06:09,266
There’s nothing beautiful
about me.

1090
01:06:09,556 —> 01:06:11,776
All the flowers in
my garden are dead.

1091
01:06:12,386 —> 01:06:14,526
Well then, I’ll take
the withered petals

1092
01:06:14,526 —> 01:06:16,966
and the withered
leaves, and the waters

1093
01:06:16,966 —> 01:06:19,606
in the fountain and
the wind left.

1094
01:06:20,796 —> 01:06:21,566
And I wept.

1095
01:06:22,076 —> 01:06:29,106
And I said to myself, what
have you done to the garden

1096
01:06:29,406 —> 01:06:33,086
that was entrusted to you.

1097
01:06:34,506 —> 01:06:35,185
Can you feel that?

1098
01:06:35,876 —> 01:06:38,166
This is a poem about
great sadness.

1099
01:06:38,776 —> 01:06:40,326
Could easily go into depression.

1100
01:06:41,526 —> 01:06:44,536
I actually — just because he’s
a noble laureate doesn’t mean,

1101
01:06:45,286 —> 01:06:48,256
you know, I’d like to
actually change the last line.

1102
01:06:50,016 —> 01:06:55,146
And I would suggest
that for our purposes,

1103
01:06:55,146 —> 01:06:58,666
rather than what have you done
to the garden that was entrusted

1104
01:06:58,666 —> 01:07:06,676
to you, which is a kind of
a blaming, wouldn’t you say?

1105
01:07:06,676 —> 01:07:10,176
I mean, it’s like, stick
the knife in, oh, all right,

1106
01:07:10,176 —> 01:07:15,366
as long as I’m feeling down, why
not just go right over the edge?

1107
01:07:17,266 —> 01:07:19,316
And a lot of cultures
actually perpetrate

1108
01:07:19,316 —> 01:07:20,826
that kind of perspective.

1109
01:07:21,336 —> 01:07:24,466
But instead, why don’t
we say what are we doing

1110
01:07:24,466 —> 01:07:27,596
with the gardens that
are entrusted to us.

1111
01:07:27,596 —> 01:07:28,966
Gardens plural, okay?

1112
01:07:29,286 —> 01:07:31,056
Because right now we have a lot

1113
01:07:31,056 —> 01:07:33,066
of gardens entrusted
to us, I would say.

1114
01:07:33,676 —> 01:07:38,996
The closest of, you know, to us,

1115
01:07:38,996 —> 01:07:40,846
is I would say the
garden of the body.

1116
01:07:41,416 —> 01:07:44,116
You know, better than an
American Express credit card,

1117
01:07:44,116 —> 01:07:45,936
you can’t leave home without it.

1118
01:07:46,406 —> 01:07:49,936
But a lot of the time
we’re not even in the body.

1119
01:07:50,076 —> 01:07:53,156
And a lot of the time our
feelings about the body are

1120
01:07:53,156 —> 01:07:56,116
so negative like, the
less said the better.

1121
01:07:56,576 —> 01:07:58,376
Just don’t bother
me about the body.

1122
01:07:59,056 —> 01:08:01,056
I don’t even want to
know it just exists.

1123
01:08:01,056 —> 01:08:06,056
If it doesn’t — is not
driving me crazy I feel lucky.

1124
01:08:06,056 —> 01:08:12,956
And William — James Joyce
is famous for starting

1125
01:08:12,956 —> 01:08:17,356
out a short story in Dubliners
with the following sentence.

1126
01:08:17,356 —> 01:08:18,505
This is an approximation,

1127
01:08:18,506 —> 01:08:21,896
but it’s Mr. Duffy lived a
short distance from his body.

1128
01:08:24,326 —> 01:08:25,926
And if you start
to pay attention

1129
01:08:25,926 —> 01:08:29,236
in the way I’m suggesting in the
present moment you’ll discover

1130
01:08:29,236 —> 01:08:33,036
that that’s your address
as well, a lot of the time.

1131
01:08:33,305 —> 01:08:35,486
We’re in our heads,
lost in thought.

1132
01:08:35,765 —> 01:08:36,805
Some place else.

1133
01:08:36,805 —> 01:08:37,616
Not in the body.

1134
01:08:38,466 —> 01:08:40,636
That has biological
consequences, by the way.

1135
01:08:41,456 —> 01:08:42,656
Everything I’ve said tonight,

1136
01:08:43,236 —> 01:08:45,026
when I started the
stress reduction clinic

1137
01:08:45,026 —> 01:08:50,555
in 1979 it was like, there was
almost no science of the effects

1138
01:08:50,555 —> 01:08:53,715
of stress and the biology
of stress on the body

1139
01:08:53,716 —> 01:08:55,866
and on the mind and
on the heart.

1140
01:08:56,156 —> 01:08:59,986
Now the data is just
like, overwhelming.

1141
01:09:01,106 —> 01:09:06,055
Including, as I’ll show
you in a minute, aging.

1142
01:09:07,316 —> 01:09:12,145
That it’s turning out that
you know, stress is —

1143
01:09:12,145 —> 01:09:16,045
they used to say stress is not
a real factor for morbidity

1144
01:09:16,046 —> 01:09:20,006
or mortality because you
know, it’s not like, you know,

1145
01:09:20,006 —> 01:09:22,476
high fat diet, it’s not
like cigarette smoking,

1146
01:09:22,475 —> 01:09:25,215
it’s not like hypertension.

1147
01:09:25,685 —> 01:09:26,696
High blood pressure.

1148
01:09:27,026 —> 01:09:30,055
But now it turns out, there’s
incontrovertible evidence

1149
01:09:30,166 —> 01:09:33,576
that stress actually reduces —

1150
01:09:33,685 —> 01:09:38,656
increases the rate of
degradation of the ends of all

1151
01:09:38,656 —> 01:09:41,435
of our chromosomes, which
are called telomeres.

1152
01:09:41,536 —> 01:09:43,176
You’re going to hear a
lot more about that word.

1153
01:09:43,786 —> 01:09:46,456
The woman Liz Blackburn at UCSF

1154
01:09:46,456 —> 01:09:50,366
who actually discovered
telomerase, which is the enzyme

1155
01:09:50,366 —> 01:09:55,336
that builds them back up,
won the Nobel Prize in 2008.

1156
01:09:56,726 —> 01:10:01,406
Okay? And her lab is studying
the effects of mindfulness

1157
01:10:01,826 —> 01:10:04,106
of telomeres and telomerase.

1158
01:10:04,456 —> 01:10:07,176
And the evidence is
moving in the direction

1159
01:10:07,476 —> 01:10:12,096
of meditation can actually
enhance telomerase,

1160
01:10:12,586 —> 01:10:17,076
and not just that, it’s more
than meditation or mindfulness.

1161
01:10:17,176 —> 01:10:19,636
It’s your attitude
towards what’s happening.

1162
01:10:19,636 —> 01:10:21,176
It’s not like these
people aren’t

1163
01:10:21,176 —> 01:10:22,936
under a huge amount of stress.

1164
01:10:23,086 —> 01:10:25,846
But it’s never the stress,
it’s how you choose to be

1165
01:10:25,846 —> 01:10:26,856
in relationship to it.

1166
01:10:27,026 —> 01:10:30,425
And if you have really
exhausted your resources

1167
01:10:30,426 —> 01:10:33,826
for handling stress, then of
course, yeah, all bets are off.

1168
01:10:33,826 —> 01:10:39,346
But if you know how to
draw resources to yourself,

1169
01:10:39,466 —> 01:10:44,766
then even under very, very high
levels of stress you can dance

1170
01:10:44,766 —> 01:10:47,925
with the energy, sometimes
it’s unbelievably painful.

1171
01:10:48,086 —> 01:10:51,036
But never the less, you’re
much bigger even than the pain

1172
01:10:51,036 —> 01:10:53,466
or suffering, and liberate
yourself from that.

1173
01:10:53,566 —> 01:10:56,366
And guess what, the
telomeres get longer.

1174
01:10:57,796 —> 01:11:01,866
So every aspect of our biology
is what’s now called plastic.

1175
01:11:03,986 —> 01:11:06,746
And that’s a new terminology.

1176
01:11:06,746 —> 01:11:10,286
It’s not like, you know,
Dustin Hoffman in The Graduate.

1177
01:11:12,026 —> 01:11:13,215
This is for the older people.

1178
01:11:16,536 —> 01:11:18,736
But it means that the —

1179
01:11:18,736 —> 01:11:22,215
our biology is miraculous
in another way.

1180
01:11:22,536 —> 01:11:25,296
It’s constantly reorganizing
itself.

1181
01:11:25,296 —> 01:11:27,736
It’s not just it’s all
downhill from here.

1182
01:11:28,006 —> 01:11:29,506
Yes, there is aging.

1183
01:11:29,506 —> 01:11:31,356
Yes, we are all going to die,

1184
01:11:31,356 —> 01:11:33,726
unless somebody makes a
very important discovery

1185
01:11:33,726 —> 01:11:34,606
very quickly.

1186
01:11:36,756 —> 01:11:40,696
But you know, the question is
not is there life after death

1187
01:11:40,696 —> 01:11:42,966
or is there some
way to escape death.

1188
01:11:43,256 —> 01:11:46,376
But actually, can we live
while we have a chance.

1189
01:11:46,966 —> 01:11:48,746
Is there life before death.

1190
01:11:49,196 —> 01:11:52,206
That’s the most interesting
question.

1191
01:11:53,216 —> 01:11:58,926
And right up to the
moment of death.

1192
01:11:59,106 —> 01:12:01,986
And a lot of time I think that
really, when we talk about fear

1193
01:12:01,986 —> 01:12:03,836
of death we’re really
more afraid

1194
01:12:03,836 —> 01:12:06,046
of life than we are of death.

1195
01:12:06,986 —> 01:12:08,376
And there are two chapters.

1196
01:12:08,376 —> 01:12:11,026
I was going to say, actually,
tell you some stories,

1197
01:12:11,026 —> 01:12:14,135
but I don’t think I will,
about my early days at MIT.

1198
01:12:14,356 —> 01:12:16,335
One of which was how
I got into meditation.

1199
01:12:16,336 —> 01:12:19,376
I got into meditation at
the Massachusetts Institute

1200
01:12:19,376 —> 01:12:22,776
of Technology as a graduate
student in molecular biology

1201
01:12:22,776 —> 01:12:25,046
with a noble laureate,
believe it or not.

1202
01:12:25,116 —> 01:12:25,786
Go figure.

1203
01:12:26,336 —> 01:12:28,096
Not in some monastery in Asia.

1204
01:12:29,296 —> 01:12:32,266
Because a Zen master came and
gave a talk, actually, at MIT.

1205
01:12:32,446 —> 01:12:35,706
And I was one of five people in
all of MIT that went to the talk

1206
01:12:36,076 —> 01:12:38,276
and took the head off —

1207
01:12:39,586 —> 01:12:42,846
took the top off my
head at the age of 22.

1208
01:12:43,266 —> 01:12:48,465
I was like, oh my God, there’s
an entirely different way

1209
01:12:48,466 —> 01:12:49,006
of knowing.

1210
01:12:49,316 —> 01:12:51,556
Why didn’t they tell us
this in kindergarten.

1211
01:12:51,606 —> 01:12:56,826
An entirely different way of
knowing, and no less beautiful,

1212
01:12:56,826 —> 01:13:00,976
no less profound, no less
transformative, than thought.

1213
01:13:02,336 —> 01:13:02,946
Just different.

1214
01:13:04,166 —> 01:13:11,076
And this should be part of
the repertoire, so to speak,

1215
01:13:12,076 —> 01:13:14,416
and part of the science
and investigation.

1216
01:13:14,636 —> 01:13:17,706
The other thing was the
story of my thesis defense,

1217
01:13:17,816 —> 01:13:23,056
because I wrote, you know, a
thesis on some arcane topic

1218
01:13:23,056 —> 01:13:25,226
in molecular biology
and I had, you know,

1219
01:13:25,316 —> 01:13:28,505
all these MIT noble
laureate types,

1220
01:13:28,626 —> 01:13:31,146
real hot-shot molecular
biologists.

1221
01:13:32,126 —> 01:13:35,296
And a few from Harvard who came
over because you always have

1222
01:13:35,296 —> 01:13:38,776
to have someone from
another institution.

1223
01:13:38,776 —> 01:13:45,496
And my thesis, you know, it was
an existential challenge for me.

1224
01:13:45,596 —> 01:13:47,835
How many of you are
graduate students here,

1225
01:13:48,246 —> 01:13:49,396
any of you a graduate student?

1226
01:13:49,646 —> 01:13:50,635
It’s like, hard.

1227
01:13:51,086 —> 01:13:54,056
It’s hard to be a
graduate student.

1228
01:13:54,676 —> 01:13:55,876
Because nobody cares.

1229
01:13:56,226 —> 01:13:58,856
And most of the time,
you don’t either.

1230
01:13:59,246 —> 01:14:01,736
But it could be really
humiliating, and like —

1231
01:14:02,036 —> 01:14:03,726
then of course if
you’re a scientist,

1232
01:14:03,996 —> 01:14:06,396
science is 99% failure.

1233
01:14:08,036 —> 01:14:12,626
Which doesn’t do that much for
your self esteem, so to speak.

1234
01:14:13,026 —> 01:14:15,306
So you’re looking for that 1%.

1235
01:14:17,476 —> 01:14:21,005
And so I finally got my
thesis together and I wrote

1236
01:14:21,006 —> 01:14:24,216
in the front page,
on a page by itself,

1237
01:14:24,216 —> 01:14:27,246
they let you have a little
dedication, little saying,

1238
01:14:27,246 —> 01:14:28,726
something like that, I wrote he

1239
01:14:28,726 —> 01:14:31,846
who dies before he dies
does not die when he dies.

1240
01:14:32,886 —> 01:14:35,896
I don’t even know
where I got it.

1241
01:14:36,076 —> 01:14:41,566
You know, it’s like some
Greek, very old Greek.

1242
01:14:41,726 —> 01:14:45,826
So I put that line in
the first, you know,

1243
01:14:46,426 —> 01:14:49,416
page by itself before
you get into the thesis.

1244
01:14:49,416 —> 01:14:57,856
And so I go into the — the
room with all these scientists

1245
01:14:59,186 —> 01:15:02,415
who are going to decide whether
I get my doctorate or not,

1246
01:15:02,746 —> 01:15:07,726
after what’s called
— I don’t know,

1247
01:15:07,726 —> 01:15:11,795
I forget what they even call
it, thesis review, or defence.

1248
01:15:12,496 —> 01:15:13,296
Right, defense.

1249
01:15:13,296 —> 01:15:14,226
It’s a war term.

1250
01:15:15,006 —> 01:15:18,536
They’re going to attack
and I’m going to defend.

1251
01:15:18,536 —> 01:15:21,696
And if I do it well enough,
then — so I go in there,

1252
01:15:22,006 —> 01:15:27,156
and I knew them all because it’s
a small community and everybody,

1253
01:15:27,156 —> 01:15:29,385
you know, sort of
likes each other.

1254
01:15:29,386 —> 01:15:32,586
And — but I was of
course terrified.

1255
01:15:32,906 —> 01:15:36,966
You know, a lot hangs
in the balance.

1256
01:15:36,966 —> 01:15:39,926
And so somebody says
what’s this he

1257
01:15:39,926 —> 01:15:42,526
who dies before he dies
does not die when he dies.

1258
01:15:43,676 —> 01:15:45,506
That’s the first
question on my thesis.

1259
01:15:45,966 —> 01:15:49,746
So I worked five years on
this research and they want

1260
01:15:49,746 —> 01:15:52,236
to know he who dies
before he dies.

1261
01:15:52,236 —> 01:15:54,026
Of course they were pushing 50.

1262
01:15:54,026 —> 01:15:56,946
You know, I was 27 or
something like that.

1263
01:15:57,116 —> 01:16:03,736
They were in their 50’s,
and like, thinking ahead?

1264
01:16:05,506 —> 01:16:07,926
Obviously piqued some interest.

1265
01:16:08,376 —> 01:16:10,306
You die before you die,
you don’t die when you die.

1266
01:16:10,516 —> 01:16:14,406
I want that.

1267
01:16:16,576 —> 01:16:21,916
So I said do you
really want to know?

1268
01:16:23,056 —> 01:16:26,156
And they all said yeah.

1269
01:16:26,156 —> 01:16:28,126
I said well, it might
take some time.

1270
01:16:29,376 —> 01:16:30,276
We’ve got time.

1271
01:16:31,266 —> 01:16:33,436
So actually, I would say half

1272
01:16:33,436 —> 01:16:36,156
of my thesis defense was
actually unpacking what

1273
01:16:36,156 —> 01:16:38,186
mindfulness is about
to these guys.

1274
01:16:39,116 —> 01:16:41,716
This was in 1971, by the way.

1275
01:16:43,016 —> 01:16:44,446
And I wrote it up.

1276
01:16:44,446 —> 01:16:47,436
It’s a chapter called
Dying Before You Die, duh,

1277
01:16:47,776 —> 01:16:52,486
because the first dying before
you die was the other story

1278
01:16:53,596 —> 01:16:56,425
that I told about, you know,

1279
01:16:56,656 —> 01:16:59,596
first encountering
meditation at MIT.

1280
01:17:00,616 —> 01:17:07,646
So that’s just to say
that I didn’t want

1281
01:17:07,646 —> 01:17:09,746
to continue a career
in molecular biology.

1282
01:17:09,746 —> 01:17:12,666
I wanted to bring my training
as a scientist together

1283
01:17:12,666 —> 01:17:15,866
with my training in meditation,
because it seemed like,

1284
01:17:15,866 —> 01:17:17,916
well everybody is
doing the science.

1285
01:17:17,956 —> 01:17:23,436
But nobody’s paying attention to
thought and this other function

1286
01:17:23,696 —> 01:17:26,296
of our brains and
nervous system,

1287
01:17:26,296 —> 01:17:29,126
that no one’s paying
attention to, called awareness,

1288
01:17:29,196 —> 01:17:31,925
that is painfully obviously
bigger than thought,

1289
01:17:31,986 —> 01:17:33,496
because whatever
thought you have

1290
01:17:33,496 —> 01:17:34,636
or whatever emotion you have,

1291
01:17:34,846 —> 01:17:36,986
you could embrace
it in awareness.

1292
01:17:37,946 —> 01:17:40,696
And not have to do anything
with it, but it would change

1293
01:17:40,846 —> 01:17:43,236
by virtue of simply
holding it in awareness

1294
01:17:43,316 —> 01:17:44,876
if you were patient
enough to do it.

1295
01:17:45,036 —> 01:17:46,516
Especially if it
didn’t feel good.

1296
01:17:47,586 —> 01:17:49,476
And so that’s what we teach now.

1297
01:17:49,696 —> 01:17:54,296
And it’s come into the main
stream of medicine in ways

1298
01:17:54,296 —> 01:17:55,836
that are really astonishing.

1299
01:17:55,836 —> 01:17:59,666
The National Institute of Health
is funding hundreds of studies

1300
01:17:59,666 —> 01:18:02,996
of mindfulness to the tunes of
hundreds of millions of dollars.

1301
01:18:03,696 —> 01:18:07,546
And the idea that that would
have been the case in 1979 I

1302
01:18:07,546 —> 01:18:12,056
like to say more improbable
than that the big bang would all

1303
01:18:12,056 —> 01:18:14,465
of a sudden stop and
implode back on itself.

1304
01:18:14,746 —> 01:18:16,216
And yet it’s happening.

1305
01:18:16,736 —> 01:18:19,846
And so mindfulness is in
the main stream of medicine.

1306
01:18:19,846 —> 01:18:23,726
And in the last — I’ll just
show you some pictures before we

1307
01:18:23,726 —> 01:18:24,996
go to questions, okay?

1308
01:18:26,086 —> 01:18:27,016
Would that be all
right with you?

1309
01:18:27,476 —> 01:18:28,205
Are you still awake?

1310
01:18:29,186 —> 01:18:30,976
Good. Because you don’t
ever have to stop.

1311
01:18:30,976 —> 01:18:32,135
Even when you go to sleep.

1312
01:18:32,136 —> 01:18:35,646
You know, that —
it’s being present.

1313
01:18:36,246 —> 01:18:38,726
That’s all.

1314
01:18:39,816 —> 01:18:40,976
Being fully present.

1315
01:18:41,516 —> 01:18:43,156
Okay? Is anybody good at this?

1316
01:18:43,316 —> 01:18:47,276
No. Okay, so don’t make,
oh, I’m no good at this.

1317
01:18:47,276 —> 01:18:49,156
Nobody’s any good at it.

1318
01:18:49,156 —> 01:18:51,635
But all you need to do
is be a little better

1319
01:18:51,636 —> 01:18:56,146
than automatic pilot and
your life will rotate.

1320
01:18:56,456 —> 01:18:57,986
It will be very, very different.

1321
01:18:58,146 —> 01:19:01,425
And any time anger comes up,
the default mode comes up,

1322
01:19:01,426 —> 01:19:02,906
whether it’s anger
or anything else,

1323
01:19:02,946 —> 01:19:04,706
Tecna Hans [Assumed spelling]
likes to say, you know,

1324
01:19:04,706 —> 01:19:07,046
the reason we have to practice
mindfulness, the reason we have

1325
01:19:07,046 —> 01:19:10,146
to cultivate it intentionally
is we’re busy cultivating the

1326
01:19:10,146 —> 01:19:11,385
opposite all day long.

1327
01:19:11,726 —> 01:19:15,476
Cultivating anger, cultivating
jealousy, cultivating, you know,

1328
01:19:15,476 —> 01:19:18,896
sort of low self esteem,
cultivating, you know,

1329
01:19:23,346 —> 01:19:27,535
all sorts of negativity
in the emotional domain

1330
01:19:27,536 —> 01:19:28,706
or in the thought domain.

1331
01:19:28,936 —> 01:19:33,016
And the people who are doing
the telomere research are saying

1332
01:19:33,016 —> 01:19:34,366
their research is showing

1333
01:19:34,366 —> 01:19:37,356
that the real stress
comes from thinking.

1334
01:19:40,366 —> 01:19:44,906
So this is a biological
and molecular,

1335
01:19:44,906 —> 01:19:50,536
biological consequence
that accelerates aging,

1336
01:19:50,536 —> 01:19:53,066
accelerates a lot of — heart
disease, I mean, it’s a —

1337
01:19:53,406 —> 01:19:56,166
you know, you can’t
interview people who die

1338
01:19:56,166 —> 01:19:57,226
of sudden cardiac death.

1339
01:19:57,786 —> 01:20:00,026
But if you could,
you’d find out, like,

1340
01:20:00,336 —> 01:20:06,246
probably it was a
thought that did it.

1341
01:20:06,246 —> 01:20:07,626
The wrong thought
at the wrong time.

1342
01:20:07,976 —> 01:20:12,795
Dead. I’m not — I’m
actually not joking.

1343
01:20:12,796 —> 01:20:15,826
I mean, it’s so serious
that we need to laugh.

1344
01:20:15,826 —> 01:20:18,636
And I want to say that
about meditation too.

1345
01:20:18,746 —> 01:20:22,386
It may seem like I’m not
taking this stuff seriously.

1346
01:20:22,386 —> 01:20:24,756
This stuff is so serious
that it’s too serious

1347
01:20:24,756 —> 01:20:25,856
to take too seriously.

1348
01:20:26,226 —> 01:20:28,566
And I’m serious.

1349
01:20:32,926 —> 01:20:36,056
So this is, if any of
you were alive back then,

1350
01:20:36,056 —> 01:20:39,096
this is the cover of Time
Magazine back in 1983.

1351
01:20:39,286 —> 01:20:41,786
Four years after I started
the stress reduction clinic.

1352
01:20:42,116 —> 01:20:43,236
And it’s just like, you know,

1353
01:20:44,106 —> 01:20:46,486
I look back on that
time and say stress?

1354
01:20:46,486 —> 01:20:47,346
What stress?

1355
01:20:48,016 —> 01:20:48,885
Compared to now.

1356
01:20:48,886 —> 01:20:50,196
I mean, there was no internet.

1357
01:20:50,196 —> 01:20:51,116
There was no e-mail.

1358
01:20:51,116 —> 01:20:52,926
There was no instant messaging.

1359
01:20:53,256 —> 01:20:57,526
I mean, you know, there were no
computers except main frames.

1360
01:20:58,136 —> 01:21:01,116
I used to say in the early
’80’s that I could get —

1361
01:21:01,116 —> 01:21:05,086
once I had my first PC, you
know, which was like, gigantic,

1362
01:21:06,566 —> 01:21:08,456
that I could get more
work done in a month

1363
01:21:08,456 —> 01:21:11,496
than I could get done — I could
get more work done in a day

1364
01:21:11,496 —> 01:21:13,136
than I used to be able
to get done in a month.

1365
01:21:13,586 —> 01:21:15,296
Well that was in the mid ’80’s.

1366
01:21:15,416 —> 01:21:18,286
Now it’s like I can get
more work done in a day

1367
01:21:18,286 —> 01:21:19,676
than I could get done in a year.

1368
01:21:19,896 —> 01:21:20,986
That’s not so good.

1369
01:21:21,556 —> 01:21:24,545
You know, we’re always on.

1370
01:21:24,916 —> 01:21:27,556
You know, we’re always on.

1371
01:21:28,396 —> 01:21:29,616
Not so good.

1372
01:21:30,496 —> 01:21:34,526
We’re not computer
servers, we’re human beings.

1373
01:21:35,756 —> 01:21:40,076
So here is the evidence from Liz
Blackburn’s lab and Alyssa Epple

1374
01:21:40,076 —> 01:21:43,326
who is the mindfulness
researcher in her lab,

1375
01:21:43,676 —> 01:21:45,096
proceedings in National Academy

1376
01:21:45,096 —> 01:21:49,276
of Sciences is showing telomere
length as a function of years

1377
01:21:49,376 —> 01:21:53,226
of chronicity of care giving,
of children, this is parents

1378
01:21:53,226 —> 01:21:55,096
with children with
severe medical

1379
01:21:55,316 —> 01:21:57,446
and — disabilities, okay?

1380
01:21:57,796 —> 01:22:00,566
So it’s like an unavoidable
stress.

1381
01:22:00,566 —> 01:22:03,295
You can’t just walk
out, I don’t do stress,

1382
01:22:03,296 —> 01:22:04,476
sorry, good-bye, children.

1383
01:22:05,326 —> 01:22:06,496
No, you can’t do that.

1384
01:22:06,656 —> 01:22:09,996
But look at this,
also in that study.

1385
01:22:09,996 —> 01:22:12,866
This is a perceived scale
— perceived stress scale.

1386
01:22:13,146 —> 01:22:17,476
It’s the perception of stress
that makes the difference.

1387
01:22:17,556 —> 01:22:21,715
If you are just dealing with
it because it’s the way it is,

1388
01:22:21,976 —> 01:22:24,406
then you can be more
transparent to the stress.

1389
01:22:24,406 —> 01:22:25,706
Your telomeres are longer.

1390
01:22:26,676 —> 01:22:28,226
If you take everything
personally,

1391
01:22:28,416 —> 01:22:29,706
your telomeres degrade.

1392
01:22:30,196 —> 01:22:33,276
So if you want one
take-home message from this,

1393
01:22:33,276 —> 01:22:37,696
this turns out to be harder
to enact that it is to say,

1394
01:22:37,956 —> 01:22:40,746
don’t take things personally
when they’re not personal.

1395
01:22:42,026 —> 01:22:44,996
Then you might ask, when
are they not personal?

1396
01:22:46,386 —> 01:22:49,006
That’s a good question
to keep asking yourself.

1397
01:22:49,176 —> 01:22:50,706
It may be they’re
never personal.

1398
01:22:52,046 —> 01:22:55,556
It may be the you that you think
you are is not the real you.

1399
01:22:56,246 —> 01:22:57,266
That you’re much bigger.

1400
01:22:57,266 —> 01:22:59,635
And now the neuro science
is actually showing that.

1401
01:22:59,796 —> 01:23:01,286
You want to be your
narrative self?

1402
01:23:01,286 —> 01:23:04,096
Fine. Then you’re using
certain regions of the brain.

1403
01:23:04,286 —> 01:23:08,386
You want to be your moment by
moment, experiential self, in —

1404
01:23:08,386 —> 01:23:09,356
grounded in the body,

1405
01:23:09,636 —> 01:23:11,546
you’re using lateral
networks in the brain.

1406
01:23:11,686 —> 01:23:14,425
A whole different brain profile.

1407
01:23:15,236 —> 01:23:16,296
So you choose.

1408
01:23:16,566 —> 01:23:18,965
One is related more
to happiness.

1409
01:23:19,206 —> 01:23:21,666
The left activation in
the prefrontal cortex,

1410
01:23:21,956 —> 01:23:23,596
if you could monks
in the scanners,

1411
01:23:23,596 —> 01:23:25,955
and I’ll show you some
pictures of that, you know,

1412
01:23:26,066 —> 01:23:29,686
they have tremendous activation
in the left prefrontal cortex

1413
01:23:29,686 —> 01:23:32,625
in particular regions that have
to do with approach and have

1414
01:23:32,696 —> 01:23:34,586
to do with emotional balance.

1415
01:23:36,496 —> 01:23:38,896
And when we train
people in MBSR,

1416
01:23:39,596 —> 01:23:41,396
they shift from right activation

1417
01:23:41,396 —> 01:23:44,516
to left activation
in eight weeks.

1418
01:23:45,076 —> 01:23:48,076
Their brains actually change
structure in eight weeks.

1419
01:23:48,076 —> 01:23:49,726
Work out of Sara Lazar’s
[Assumed spelling] lab,

1420
01:23:50,096 —> 01:23:53,366
German post doctoral fellow
who’s training with us in MBSR

1421
01:23:53,596 —> 01:23:56,205
and has been our student,
Britta hisle [Assumed spelling]

1422
01:23:56,416 —> 01:23:59,646
for years from Germany,
young neuro scientist,

1423
01:24:00,106 —> 01:24:06,776
has demonstrated that major
regions of the brain change

1424
01:24:06,776 —> 01:24:09,106
with eight weeks of
mindfulness training in MBSR.

1425
01:24:09,366 —> 01:24:13,026
Including the hippocampus,
including the cerebellum,

1426
01:24:13,026 —> 01:24:18,946
including the posterior
singular cortex.

1427
01:24:19,206 —> 01:24:25,326
All of these are involved
in making meaning in —

1428
01:24:25,326 —> 01:24:29,746
in self-regulation,
in perception,

1429
01:24:30,066 —> 01:24:31,686
decoding, memory, and learning.

1430
01:24:32,636 —> 01:24:35,786
Not bad for eight weeks of what
looks a lot, if you were looking

1431
01:24:35,786 —> 01:24:37,446
in from the outside
on our patients,

1432
01:24:37,446 —> 01:24:38,416
looks a lot like nothing.

1433
01:24:38,626 —> 01:24:39,816
They do nothing lying down.

1434
01:24:40,196 —> 01:24:43,186
Then they do nothing sitting,
then they do nothing walking.

1435
01:24:43,326 —> 01:24:44,206
Like this.

1436
01:24:44,206 —> 01:24:45,826
Like the night of
the living dead.

1437
01:24:45,826 —> 01:24:48,006
You know, really slow,
meditative walking.

1438
01:24:48,226 —> 01:24:49,156
They’re doing nothing.

1439
01:24:49,356 —> 01:24:51,116
And healthcare is paying for it.

1440
01:24:51,116 —> 01:24:55,016
Amazing. How did they pull
that off in and it turns

1441
01:24:55,016 —> 01:24:57,925
out the brains are changing,
not just in terms of activity,

1442
01:24:58,106 —> 01:24:59,226
in terms of structure.

1443
01:25:00,596 —> 01:25:03,035
Significant thickening in
those regions I mentioned,

1444
01:25:03,266 —> 01:25:05,236
significant thinning
in the amygdala,

1445
01:25:05,236 —> 01:25:09,346
which is the emotional
reaction — reactivity center,

1446
01:25:09,346 —> 01:25:11,005
the threat center
that triggers —

1447
01:25:11,226 —> 01:25:15,056
fires off all the time whenever
we feel threatened or, you know,

1448
01:25:15,056 —> 01:25:16,425
accosted in one way or another.

1449
01:25:17,536 —> 01:25:23,506
So God, I’ve got a whole talk
here I’m not going to give.

1450
01:25:23,506 —> 01:25:25,466
How many of you see a triangle?

1451
01:25:25,496 —> 01:25:28,156
Raise your hand if you see
a triangle in this picture.

1452
01:25:28,376 —> 01:25:30,286
Okay, keep your hands up there.

1453
01:25:30,436 —> 01:25:33,486
Okay, now look around, so
you know you’re not alone.

1454
01:25:33,486 —> 01:25:34,946
If you see a triangle
in that picture.

1455
01:25:35,516 —> 01:25:37,665
It’s interesting, because
there’s no triangle

1456
01:25:37,666 —> 01:25:38,156
in that picture.

1457
01:25:40,316 —> 01:25:43,795
The triangle is defined
by a three-sided figure.

1458
01:25:44,036 —> 01:25:46,626
And what your mind does
is it puts in the sides.

1459
01:25:47,606 —> 01:25:50,766
If we shifted that little
Pac-man the tiniest little bit,

1460
01:25:51,666 —> 01:25:55,526
so the mind can actually see
things that are not there.

1461
01:25:55,526 —> 01:25:56,866
The brain actually does that.

1462
01:25:56,866 —> 01:25:58,236
It’s so good at that.

1463
01:25:58,486 —> 01:26:01,086
If I had time I would show
you this movie, which —

1464
01:26:04,016 —> 01:26:05,835
how many of you have
seen this image?

1465
01:26:06,436 —> 01:26:07,835
Yeah, you can’t use it any more.

1466
01:26:07,836 —> 01:26:10,286
But I’ll just play
it anyway — oops.

1467
01:26:12,616 —> 01:26:13,866
Doesn’t want to do that.

1468
01:26:13,866 —> 01:26:15,136
Let me see.

1469
01:26:16,356 —> 01:26:17,566
Anyway, it’s a movie.

1470
01:26:18,136 —> 01:26:21,116
And they’re passing
around basketballs.

1471
01:26:21,116 —> 01:26:24,186
And you ask the group, you
ask the room to sort of count

1472
01:26:24,186 —> 01:26:25,085
of number of times the people

1473
01:26:25,086 —> 01:26:26,906
in the white shirts
pass the basketballs.

1474
01:26:28,096 —> 01:26:31,696
And I could get it to work,
but it would take too long.

1475
01:26:32,316 —> 01:26:36,486
So — and in the middle of
it, I’ll try one more time,

1476
01:26:36,486 —> 01:26:42,766
in the middle of it,
because it’s, you know, oh.

1477
01:26:44,046 —> 01:26:50,496
No. Okay, so you’re counting
the number of times the people

1478
01:26:50,496 —> 01:26:52,506
in the white shirts are
passing the basketballs.

1479
01:26:53,926 —> 01:26:56,696
One basketball per each,
the whites and the blacks.

1480
01:26:56,696 —> 01:27:01,196
And in the middle
this gorilla comes out

1481
01:27:01,196 —> 01:27:04,236
and then goes off
to the other side.

1482
01:27:05,546 —> 01:27:08,966
But when you ask people,
well, to count the number

1483
01:27:08,966 —> 01:27:11,196
of times the people in the white
shirts pass the basketball,

1484
01:27:11,596 —> 01:27:13,035
they don’t actually
see the gorilla.

1485
01:27:14,256 —> 01:27:18,336
If we did it and none of you
had seen it, 95% of people

1486
01:27:18,436 —> 01:27:20,146
who have counted the
number of times —

1487
01:27:20,336 —> 01:27:23,226
usually you get a
plus on distribution.

1488
01:27:23,226 —> 01:27:25,936
So you can’t even
count correctly.

1489
01:27:26,716 —> 01:27:28,476
But then you don’t
see the gorilla.

1490
01:27:28,476 —> 01:27:31,306
Why? Because the
mind has told itself,

1491
01:27:31,306 —> 01:27:34,425
the brain has told itself
the white shirts are

1492
01:27:34,426 —> 01:27:35,296
what’s important.

1493
01:27:35,356 —> 01:27:37,286
Tune out everything
that’s not white.

1494
01:27:38,836 —> 01:27:41,246
Well, the brain it turns
out is fantastic is —

1495
01:27:41,636 —> 01:27:44,526
I just showed you, it sees
things that aren’t there,

1496
01:27:44,886 —> 01:27:46,426
and it doesn’t see
things that are there.

1497
01:27:46,546 —> 01:27:47,766
Not very reliable.

1498
01:27:50,016 —> 01:27:53,146
Now does that apply to you?

1499
01:27:53,316 —> 01:27:54,836
I’ll leave that for
you to decide.

1500
01:27:55,866 —> 01:27:58,756
Just ask your spouse or
your mother or your father.

1501
01:27:59,566 —> 01:28:02,965
Because that is part
of the default mode.

1502
01:28:03,306 —> 01:28:06,096
We are out of touch, seriously
out of touch with a lot

1503
01:28:06,096 —> 01:28:07,915
of different elements of this.

1504
01:28:08,286 —> 01:28:09,476
And this is just of a quote

1505
01:28:09,476 —> 01:28:11,996
from William James
that’s basically saying

1506
01:28:11,996 —> 01:28:14,116
if we could learn how
to bring the mind back

1507
01:28:14,116 —> 01:28:16,836
when it was wandering,
that would be a good thing.

1508
01:28:17,026 —> 01:28:18,465
Turns out the Buddhists
have been doing

1509
01:28:18,466 —> 01:28:19,766
that for thousands of years.

1510
01:28:20,056 —> 01:28:22,545
So I’m going to stop,
actually, at this point.

1511
01:28:22,866 —> 01:28:24,986
And take a few questions.

1512
01:28:24,986 —> 01:28:26,215
We have some time for questions.

1513
01:28:26,216 —> 01:28:27,946
And then we’ll stop
for the evening.

1514
01:28:28,806 —> 01:28:34,076
obviously, you can see that
I’ve just gotten started.

1515
01:28:35,846 —> 01:28:37,396
I hope you’ve just
gotten started.

1516
01:28:38,346 —> 01:28:39,056
I’m not joking.

1517
01:28:40,056 —> 01:28:42,146
Because this doesn’t stop.

1518
01:28:43,226 —> 01:28:44,866
It’s called your life.

1519
01:28:45,766 —> 01:28:49,446
And it’s all really
more than magnificent.

1520
01:28:50,616 —> 01:28:54,196
And if you can get into
that implicational meaning

1521
01:28:54,196 —> 01:28:58,666
of the poems, the poetry,
then there’s the potential

1522
01:28:58,666 —> 01:29:01,776
to actually live your life as
if it really mattered moment

1523
01:29:01,776 —> 01:29:04,606
by moment, and it turns
out that that’s recruiting

1524
01:29:04,856 —> 01:29:08,696
and morphing brain pathways
that when you’re depressed,

1525
01:29:08,916 —> 01:29:10,806
you’re into a depressive
rumination,

1526
01:29:11,516 —> 01:29:13,516
it’s not about shutting
that stuff off,

1527
01:29:13,596 —> 01:29:15,486
that kind of toxic
thought stream,

1528
01:29:15,726 —> 01:29:18,205
but actually learning how
to hold it differently.

1529
01:29:18,206 —> 01:29:19,516
And then you don’t
take it personally

1530
01:29:19,516 —> 01:29:22,596
and then you actually
don’t fall into depression.

1531
01:29:22,876 —> 01:29:24,696
You don’t relapse
into depression.

1532
01:29:24,696 —> 01:29:26,966
And I’m talking major
depressive disorder.

1533
01:29:27,666 —> 01:29:30,136
And so — and that
effects your telomeres,

1534
01:29:30,136 —> 01:29:33,006
and that effects actually
gene expression in the body

1535
01:29:33,366 —> 01:29:35,176
up regulating and
down regulating.

1536
01:29:35,176 —> 01:29:38,976
Hundreds of genes that have to
do with cancer and have to do

1537
01:29:38,976 —> 01:29:40,835
with inflammatory responses.

1538
01:29:40,836 —> 01:29:44,166
So if — your whole
body is really plastic,

1539
01:29:44,166 —> 01:29:46,476
and the more you tune the mind

1540
01:29:46,476 —> 01:29:49,446
and the body together
the more you participate

1541
01:29:49,616 —> 01:29:51,036
in your own health
and well being.

1542
01:29:51,356 —> 01:29:54,696
I like to call the medicine
of the future or the medicine

1543
01:29:54,696 —> 01:29:57,076
of the present, actually,
participatory medicine.

1544
01:29:57,496 —> 01:29:59,846
That’s what — because
there’s not enough money

1545
01:30:00,426 —> 01:30:03,996
to fund medicine if we just
use the auto mechanic’s model.

1546
01:30:03,996 —> 01:30:05,676
So we need to all participate.

1547
01:30:05,906 —> 01:30:08,306
And isn’t it interesting,
that in order

1548
01:30:08,306 —> 01:30:11,635
to participate the greatest
evidence is suggesting we need

1549
01:30:11,636 —> 01:30:15,446
to go back to ancient,
ancient practices from very,

1550
01:30:15,446 —> 01:30:17,896
very old traditions
that are mostly not

1551
01:30:18,096 —> 01:30:19,566
from this side of the planet.

1552
01:30:19,836 —> 01:30:23,406
But that turns out have
deep, deep connections

1553
01:30:23,626 —> 01:30:27,146
with our culture and
with our nervous system

1554
01:30:27,306 —> 01:30:28,976
and with your love.

1555
01:30:29,526 —> 01:30:31,206
So I’ll leave it at that.

1556
01:30:31,206 —> 01:30:33,786
I want to thank you for
your attention, and I’m open

1557
01:30:33,786 —> 01:30:35,036
to having a few questions.

1558
01:30:35,466 —> 01:30:35,976
Thank you.

1559
01:30:36,516 —> 01:30:49,696
[ Applause ]

1560
01:30:50,196 —> 01:30:51,566
>> Thank you for your attention.

1561
01:30:52,526 —> 01:30:52,836
And —

1562
01:30:52,836 —> 01:30:56,376
>> And if you need
to go we understand.

1563
01:30:56,516 —> 01:30:57,526
>> Yeah, obviously.

1564
01:30:57,526 —> 01:30:58,755
It’s 6 o’clock.

1565
01:30:58,866 —> 01:31:02,176
>> There is a book signing
outside the auditorium

1566
01:31:02,176 —> 01:31:04,236
after the question
and answer period.

1567
01:31:04,236 —> 01:31:05,366
Just so people know.

1568
01:31:05,366 —> 01:31:07,186
>> And so why don’t we
— okay, you’ve got —

1569
01:31:07,186 —> 01:31:09,635
why don’t you line up with
that microphone behind the guy

1570
01:31:09,636 —> 01:31:12,276
who has it, and we’ve got
another one over here.

1571
01:31:12,856 —> 01:31:14,856
So go ahead.

1572
01:31:21,726 —> 01:31:24,786
Oh, you’re not actually
asking a question,

1573
01:31:24,786 —> 01:31:26,466
you’re just offering —
well, give it to her.

1574
01:31:29,826 —> 01:31:30,616
>> Thank you so much.

1575
01:31:30,616 —> 01:31:32,226
I really appreciate that talk.

1576
01:31:32,226 —> 01:31:33,205
It was fascinating.

1577
01:31:33,926 —> 01:31:37,036
One question I had was
actually from your biography

1578
01:31:37,036 —> 01:31:39,666
that was provided, which
was just talking about you

1579
01:31:39,666 —> 01:31:42,146
and your wife’s interest
in supporting initiatives

1580
01:31:42,176 —> 01:31:45,156
that further mindfulness
in K through 12 education.

1581
01:31:45,316 —> 01:31:47,766
And I wondered if you could
just provide some examples

1582
01:31:47,766 —> 01:31:49,446
of what exactly that can look

1583
01:31:49,526 —> 01:31:53,226
like in public education
and beyond?

1584
01:31:53,226 —> 01:31:54,925
>> Okay, thank you
for that question.

1585
01:31:54,926 —> 01:31:58,076
I alluded to it, but
obviously, you know,

1586
01:31:59,496 —> 01:32:03,636
the subject of mindfulness is
so vast and to do it in a way

1587
01:32:03,636 —> 01:32:06,276
that isn’t just throwing facts

1588
01:32:07,006 —> 01:32:11,846
at you would take actually
multiple occasions.

1589
01:32:12,336 —> 01:32:18,366
Or you can remember what we
touch on today and then find

1590
01:32:18,366 —> 01:32:22,216
out more for yourself, which
is really the best part.

1591
01:32:22,216 —> 01:32:25,896
But in the book that my wife
and I, Myla, wrote together

1592
01:32:25,896 —> 01:32:28,625
on mindful parenting, which
is a while other story,

1593
01:32:28,886 —> 01:32:32,996
there’s a chapter in there about
fourth and fifth grade teacher

1594
01:32:32,996 —> 01:32:38,226
from the Utah public school who
herself experienced mindfulness

1595
01:32:38,226 —> 01:32:40,786
in MBSR for medical
reasons, health reasons,

1596
01:32:41,156 —> 01:32:43,306
and then brought it into
her classroom against all

1597
01:32:43,306 —> 01:32:45,156
of my advice, in Mormon Utah

1598
01:32:45,576 —> 01:32:47,396
and it transformed
the entire school.

1599
01:32:47,936 —> 01:32:49,486
So you could start there.

1600
01:32:49,536 —> 01:32:51,896
You can also Google
mindfulness in education.

1601
01:32:51,896 —> 01:32:55,755
You’ll find out there are
groups of teachers in lots

1602
01:32:55,756 —> 01:32:57,106
of different places
that are doing this.

1603
01:32:57,106 —> 01:33:01,436
And if you want to take a trip
up 89 to South Burlington,

1604
01:33:01,436 —> 01:33:03,766
Vermont, I was just there
a couple of weeks ago,

1605
01:33:03,766 —> 01:33:06,656
and they are doing amazing
things in that school system.

1606
01:33:06,856 —> 01:33:10,366
The superintendent and one of
the principals actually came

1607
01:33:10,366 —> 01:33:12,836
to a day-long mindfulness
retreat that I did

1608
01:33:12,836 —> 01:33:15,576
for the teachers and
there are hundreds

1609
01:33:15,576 —> 01:33:16,876
of teachers bringing mindfulness

1610
01:33:16,876 —> 01:33:20,146
into their curriculum
at every age.

1611
01:33:20,456 —> 01:33:22,366
So there’s a lot to
be said about it.

1612
01:33:22,366 —> 01:33:24,046
I think it’s one
of the best things

1613
01:33:24,046 —> 01:33:25,916
to happen in modern education.

1614
01:33:26,276 —> 01:33:33,456
And it’s really inspiring the
teachers because nowadays it’s

1615
01:33:33,456 —> 01:33:36,736
so challenging, and there’s so
much stress in that profession.

1616
01:33:36,986 —> 01:33:39,706
And so many of the kids come
and they’re not ready to learn.

1617
01:33:39,706 —> 01:33:41,546
So they need to learn
how to learn,

1618
01:33:41,906 —> 01:33:44,406
tuning the instrument before
you play it, so to speak.

1619
01:33:44,736 —> 01:33:48,936
And this is a way to
actually allow that to happen

1620
01:33:48,936 —> 01:33:51,375
and in a way that — I’ve
been in classrooms like this

1621
01:33:51,376 —> 01:33:53,546
in Oakland, and in
Manhattan, in New York City,

1622
01:33:53,996 —> 01:33:56,716
public schools, unbelievable.

1623
01:33:57,046 —> 01:34:00,066
I mean, and one teacher in
South Burlington called it a

1624
01:34:00,066 —> 01:34:00,925
pin-drop moment.

1625
01:34:01,326 —> 01:34:04,596
You could hear a pin drop
in these classes where a lot

1626
01:34:04,596 —> 01:34:07,585
of the kids are like,
ordinarily all over the place.

1627
01:34:07,886 —> 01:34:09,906
But they have actually
learned how to drop in.

1628
01:34:09,906 —> 01:34:12,376
It’s value for attention
deficit disorder,

1629
01:34:12,376 —> 01:34:16,346
attention deficit hyperactivity
disorder, and it’s also valuable

1630
01:34:16,346 —> 01:34:18,205
for the teacher’s sanity.

1631
01:34:18,656 —> 01:34:20,716
Thank you.

1632
01:34:21,656 —> 01:34:22,135
So —

1633
01:34:23,616 —> 01:34:28,476
>> Hello. I was just wondering
what your general advice would

1634
01:34:28,536 —> 01:34:32,196
be, when we’re trying to, you
know, live it moment by moment,

1635
01:34:32,196 —> 01:34:34,986
but we’re faced with moments
where we have to make decisions.

1636
01:34:35,626 —> 01:34:38,656
And I know we have to make
dozens of decisions every day.

1637
01:34:38,656 —> 01:34:40,796
And sometimes they are
big decisions regarding,

1638
01:34:41,246 —> 01:34:43,816
like our futures or
personal relationships,

1639
01:34:43,816 —> 01:34:45,295
and my friends are
always telling me,

1640
01:34:45,296 —> 01:34:46,496
like, don’t overthink it.

1641
01:34:46,766 —> 01:34:48,465
>> Don’t overthink it?

1642
01:34:48,466 —> 01:34:51,826
>> Yeah. But I know
it’s really difficult.

1643
01:34:51,826 —> 01:34:52,346
So —

1644
01:34:52,866 —> 01:34:54,696
>> Well, it’s a great question.

1645
01:34:57,186 —> 01:34:58,146
Now you want an answer?

1646
01:34:58,776 —> 01:34:59,016
>> Yeah.

1647
01:34:59,516 —> 01:35:01,965
[ Laughter ]

1648
01:35:02,466 —> 01:35:04,966
>> I realize that’s the reason
why I decided to come today.

1649
01:35:05,126 —> 01:35:06,166
>> Oh. Wonderful.

1650
01:35:09,096 —> 01:35:09,625
Wonderful.

1651
01:35:10,126 —> 01:35:14,446
[ Laughter ]

1652
01:35:14,946 —> 01:35:18,276
>> You’re probably
going to overthink it.

1653
01:35:19,496 —> 01:35:23,606
But you can hold that in
awareness, the overthinking.

1654
01:35:23,906 —> 01:35:26,116
And the awareness will
actually take care of you.

1655
01:35:26,406 —> 01:35:29,276
A lot of times — let’s
say it’s relationships,

1656
01:35:29,276 —> 01:35:30,906
you mentioned relationships,
is that right?

1657
01:35:32,356 —> 01:35:34,085
And it’s very complicated.

1658
01:35:34,086 —> 01:35:37,976
And you know, mindfulness
is all about relationships.

1659
01:35:38,296 —> 01:35:39,296
We start with the body.

1660
01:35:39,856 —> 01:35:41,496
What’s my relationship
with my body?

1661
01:35:42,096 —> 01:35:44,375
It’s pretty weird even to
say I have a relationship

1662
01:35:44,376 —> 01:35:44,986
with my body.

1663
01:35:45,156 —> 01:35:45,746
Who’s talking?

1664
01:35:48,486 —> 01:35:49,696
You’re not your body.

1665
01:35:49,786 —> 01:35:51,646
But you have a body.

1666
01:35:51,646 —> 01:35:54,976
Oh yeah? So something
even there,

1667
01:35:54,976 —> 01:35:57,896
that we don’t know a
lot more than we let on.

1668
01:35:58,366 —> 01:35:59,696
Okay, then you have
a relationship

1669
01:35:59,746 —> 01:36:01,956
with your mind and your heart.

1670
01:36:02,336 —> 01:36:06,076
In all Asian languages, as you
may know, the word for mind

1671
01:36:06,076 —> 01:36:07,686
and the word for heart
is the same word.

1672
01:36:08,006 —> 01:36:09,396
So when you hear the
word mindfulness,

1673
01:36:09,396 —> 01:36:10,755
if you’re not hearing
heartfullness,

1674
01:36:10,756 —> 01:36:12,946
you’re not hearing — you’re
not really understanding.

1675
01:36:13,506 —> 01:36:18,566
It’s got this tenor of
spaciousness of heart, okay?

1676
01:36:18,996 —> 01:36:22,616
So inside of that, a
certain kind of trust.

1677
01:36:23,046 —> 01:36:24,416
And trust in what?

1678
01:36:24,566 —> 01:36:25,946
How about your own beauty?

1679
01:36:27,106 —> 01:36:29,986
Okay, so when you start to
know yourself in that kind

1680
01:36:29,986 —> 01:36:32,286
of non conceptual way,
not with thinking,

1681
01:36:32,286 —> 01:36:37,116
but through embodied awareness
of sensation and of, you know,

1682
01:36:37,356 —> 01:36:39,356
hearing and smelling and
tasting, and stuff like —

1683
01:36:40,036 —> 01:36:43,346
and of your thoughts, that
are overthinking who to be

1684
01:36:43,346 —> 01:36:44,436
in a relationship with,

1685
01:36:44,436 —> 01:36:46,556
or who to break off
a relationship with,

1686
01:36:46,556 —> 01:36:49,486
or whatever it is, and you’re
not judging that whole thing —

1687
01:36:50,806 —> 01:36:55,885
your deeper intuition and
wisdom is trustworthy.

1688
01:36:57,766 —> 01:37:02,436
And when you get into trouble,
that’s trustworthy too.

1689
01:37:02,436 —> 01:37:05,295
Oh, I see, I made this kind
of decision, I overthought it

1690
01:37:05,386 —> 01:37:08,616
to this degree, and
I wound up, whamo,

1691
01:37:08,946 —> 01:37:10,496
in some place I didn’t
want to be.

1692
01:37:10,806 —> 01:37:12,776
That’s important information.

1693
01:37:12,776 —> 01:37:14,056
That’s useful data.

1694
01:37:14,956 —> 01:37:18,006
Then you learn from that, an
the next time if you’re really,

1695
01:37:18,106 —> 01:37:19,786
really, really, really mindful,

1696
01:37:20,026 —> 01:37:21,516
you won’t repeat
the same pattern.

1697
01:37:22,516 —> 01:37:25,986
But mostly what we do is
repeat the same old pattern,

1698
01:37:26,186 —> 01:37:27,856
over and over and over again.

1699
01:37:28,226 —> 01:37:30,896
Because we’re attracted
to just those people

1700
01:37:31,046 —> 01:37:32,996
who are not so healthy for us.

1701
01:37:33,876 —> 01:37:36,146
If you’ve read The Power of
Now, Ecarte Tole [Phonetic],

1702
01:37:36,246 —> 01:37:38,656
which I recommend you read
these kinds of things,

1703
01:37:38,876 —> 01:37:42,066
he talks about a kind of
construct called a pain body.

1704
01:37:42,866 —> 01:37:46,476
So a lot of, like, falling
in love is like if you start

1705
01:37:46,476 —> 01:37:50,356
to look at it, is by pain
body, what’s all knotted up

1706
01:37:50,356 —> 01:37:54,465
and painful and hurt in me
recognizes what’s all knotted up

1707
01:37:54,466 —> 01:37:57,766
and painful and hurt in you, and
those pain bodies fall in love.

1708
01:37:57,766 —> 01:37:59,885
Meanwhile — not a good idea.

1709
01:38:00,376 —> 01:38:03,116
Because it’s what you call
a dysfunctional relationship

1710
01:38:03,116 —> 01:38:03,946
from the start.

1711
01:38:04,846 —> 01:38:10,366
You know, but the awareness can
see that, and it can save you.

1712
01:38:10,366 —> 01:38:11,986
I have a friend at MIT,

1713
01:38:11,986 —> 01:38:13,965
one of the graduate
students with me in my lab.

1714
01:38:14,376 —> 01:38:17,266
And he said — he decided
to get married at one point,

1715
01:38:17,596 —> 01:38:19,755
and I did — the only
time I’ve ever done this,

1716
01:38:19,996 —> 01:38:22,776
I gave somebody advice about
who they wanted to marry.

1717
01:38:22,886 —> 01:38:24,516
And I said don’t do it.

1718
01:38:25,596 —> 01:38:26,226
I was young.

1719
01:38:27,156 —> 01:38:27,856
And arrogant.

1720
01:38:28,276 —> 01:38:29,206
So I said don’t do it.

1721
01:38:29,656 —> 01:38:31,226
He did it anyway, of course.

1722
01:38:31,566 —> 01:38:32,276
He got married.

1723
01:38:32,506 —> 01:38:33,716
Thee years later
they got divorced,

1724
01:38:33,756 —> 01:38:36,126
and he said to me
later, he said you know,

1725
01:38:36,646 —> 01:38:38,116
how come it took
you three seconds

1726
01:38:38,166 —> 01:38:39,816
to see what it took
me three years to see.

1727
01:38:39,816 —> 01:38:43,545
And I said well, it’s because,
you know, I wasn’t in it.

1728
01:38:44,476 —> 01:38:45,776
To see it when you’re in it,

1729
01:38:46,366 —> 01:38:49,666
that requires a whole different
rotation in consciousness.

1730
01:38:49,766 —> 01:38:51,036
But it is trustworthy.

1731
01:38:51,036 —> 01:38:54,786
So there is no answer to your
question, it’s life unfolding.

1732
01:38:54,896 —> 01:38:57,146
And whether it’s your
relationship to another person

1733
01:38:57,306 —> 01:39:00,635
or with choosing courses or
a career path or anything

1734
01:39:00,636 —> 01:39:02,286
like that, trust your love.

1735
01:39:02,806 —> 01:39:09,056
And as what’s his name, Joseph
Campbell said, and you know,

1736
01:39:09,056 —> 01:39:12,766
this is a really good piece
of advice, follow your bliss.

1737
01:39:13,756 —> 01:39:14,706
Follow your bliss.

1738
01:39:15,076 —> 01:39:17,046
And it will teach you
everything you need to know,

1739
01:39:17,046 —> 01:39:19,466
including how sometimes
following your bliss needs

1740
01:39:19,466 —> 01:39:21,076
to be modulated a little bit.

1741
01:39:23,446 —> 01:39:26,385
I hope that helps, because I
don’t have anything else to say.

1742
01:39:26,386 —> 01:39:27,636
>> Thank you.

1743
01:39:28,516 —> 01:39:35,096
[ Applause ]

1744
01:39:35,596 —> 01:39:38,186
>> People are saying that
life is more complicated

1745
01:39:38,186 —> 01:39:41,186
and more stressful now,
and I would believe it,

1746
01:39:41,186 —> 01:39:44,056
I don’t have anything
to measure it against.

1747
01:39:44,056 —> 01:39:45,186
And also the same with war.

1748
01:39:45,186 —> 01:39:48,436
That people go to war and come
back having experienced things

1749
01:39:48,436 —> 01:39:50,656
that they might not have
lived through in other wars.

1750
01:39:51,216 —> 01:39:55,466
And there are scientists
working on PTSD and trying

1751
01:39:55,466 —> 01:39:58,946
to help people heal from those
things they might not have

1752
01:39:59,016 —> 01:39:59,476
lived through.

1753
01:39:59,756 —> 01:40:01,396
And so sometimes I
think about how we’re —

1754
01:40:01,916 —> 01:40:05,346
like, if the world is becoming
for stressful or complicated

1755
01:40:05,836 —> 01:40:07,916
and our answer is
change yourself,

1756
01:40:07,946 —> 01:40:11,486
change your relationship
with that stress, it seems —

1757
01:40:12,406 —> 01:40:16,406
I’m not sure, it seems — I
don’t know how to say it —

1758
01:40:16,666 —> 01:40:17,546
>> I got it.

1759
01:40:18,086 —> 01:40:19,656
Thanks. That’s the
other half of my talk.

1760
01:40:19,656 —> 01:40:20,266
>> All right.

1761
01:40:21,176 —> 01:40:23,356
>> So thank you for
bringing that up.

1762
01:40:23,356 —> 01:40:26,186
So let me just very
quickly say this isn’t

1763
01:40:26,186 —> 01:40:27,726
about changing yourself.

1764
01:40:27,726 —> 01:40:28,915
It’s about recognizing —

1765
01:40:28,916 —> 01:40:31,506
it’s exactly the opposite
of changing yourself.

1766
01:40:31,506 —> 01:40:34,516
It’s recognizing the
beauty in yourself already.

1767
01:40:34,776 —> 01:40:36,126
No change necessary.

1768
01:40:36,426 —> 01:40:39,816
Now imagine if the congress
actually were mindful.

1769
01:40:42,686 —> 01:40:45,016
Okay? Actually, there
is a congress man

1770
01:40:45,536 —> 01:40:50,896
in the congress now, Tim Ryan
from the 17 eighteenth district

1771
01:40:50,896 —> 01:40:54,875
in Ohio who is doing everything
he can to bring mindfulness

1772
01:40:54,876 —> 01:40:58,356
into the main stream in the
political and economic circles.

1773
01:40:58,956 —> 01:41:01,266
You’ll see his name
around from time to time.

1774
01:41:01,266 —> 01:41:02,526
Fifth term congress man.

1775
01:41:02,866 —> 01:41:06,726
But the much longer thing,
and I wrote 100 pages

1776
01:41:06,936 —> 01:41:09,346
of mindful politics and
coming to our senses.

1777
01:41:09,546 —> 01:41:11,216
This is not about forgetting

1778
01:41:11,216 —> 01:41:13,726
about social change
or transformation.

1779
01:41:14,056 —> 01:41:18,635
But in order to really have
profound social change that’s

1780
01:41:18,636 —> 01:41:22,716
in alignment with
humanity and with kindness,

1781
01:41:22,716 —> 01:41:24,106
we have to look at
our own minds.

1782
01:41:24,136 —> 01:41:27,356
Because even the social change
agents are driven by greed,

1783
01:41:27,356 —> 01:41:29,806
hatred, and delusion, just
like all the rest of us.

1784
01:41:30,236 —> 01:41:33,286
Okay, so until we
learn how to sort

1785
01:41:33,286 —> 01:41:38,646
of at least recognize the toxic
or the sort of inquisitive,

1786
01:41:38,956 —> 01:41:43,656
violent aspects in ourself,
then we can do all we want

1787
01:41:43,656 —> 01:41:46,316
to transform the
institutions and even the laws.

1788
01:41:46,546 —> 01:41:50,136
But human beings, being
what they are, what we need

1789
01:41:50,136 —> 01:41:51,896
to do is transform the species.

1790
01:41:52,446 —> 01:41:54,356
Or I wouldn’t say
transform the species,

1791
01:41:54,546 —> 01:41:56,756
I would say have the
species come into its own.

1792
01:41:57,046 —> 01:41:59,626
Because we call ourselves
Homo sapiens sapiens.

1793
01:42:00,186 —> 01:42:04,906
In Latin, saperi [Phonetic] is
the verb to taste or to know.

1794
01:42:04,906 —> 01:42:05,736
Okay, K-N-O-W.

1795
01:42:06,196 —> 01:42:09,206
So Homo sapien sapien is
the species that knows.

1796
01:42:09,436 —> 01:42:11,175
And knows that it knows.

1797
01:42:11,176 —> 01:42:14,486
So in other words, awareness,
yes, and meta awareness,

1798
01:42:14,486 —> 01:42:15,666
awareness of awareness.

1799
01:42:15,886 —> 01:42:17,916
Now if we really —
that would be wisdom.

1800
01:42:19,106 —> 01:42:20,916
If we actually were wise,

1801
01:42:21,486 —> 01:42:25,486
then we would see what
war does to societies.

1802
01:42:25,816 —> 01:42:28,916
We would understand that we —

1803
01:42:28,916 —> 01:42:31,326
you know, with the kind
of preciosity and weapons

1804
01:42:31,326 —> 01:42:34,596
and fire power and everything,
we need to find other ways

1805
01:42:34,596 —> 01:42:36,085
of resolving human conflict.

1806
01:42:36,376 —> 01:42:37,596
But where’s that
going to come from?

1807
01:42:37,756 —> 01:42:39,386
It’s going to come out
of the same human heart,

1808
01:42:39,466 —> 01:42:42,486
the same human mind,
and corporations,

1809
01:42:42,486 —> 01:42:44,836
which after all mean
bodies, okay,

1810
01:42:45,026 —> 01:42:48,026
the corpus or the body politic.

1811
01:42:48,446 —> 01:42:50,756
And that’s made up
of human beings.

1812
01:42:50,996 —> 01:42:54,376
So we do need to sort of
tune the instrument on lots

1813
01:42:54,376 —> 01:42:58,446
of different levels, including
the law and jurisprudence

1814
01:42:58,446 —> 01:43:08,096
to actually privilege awareness
over a kind of dualistic,

1815
01:43:08,096 —> 01:43:14,375
adversarial condition where
it’s really winners and losers.

1816
01:43:15,166 —> 01:43:18,716
And a huge amount of harm and
social injustice gets done

1817
01:43:18,886 —> 01:43:21,316
and then we learn to sort of
tolerate it, thinking well,

1818
01:43:21,316 —> 01:43:24,436
a hundred years from
now it will be better.

1819
01:43:25,076 —> 01:43:27,836
So this is not going
to happen over night.

1820
01:43:27,836 —> 01:43:29,626
I have a very long time horizon.

1821
01:43:29,626 —> 01:43:33,166
Like — I like to say, one
Zen master put it this way,

1822
01:43:33,366 —> 01:43:35,306
never forget the
thousand-year view.

1823
01:43:35,546 —> 01:43:38,146
I actually have pretty
much a thousand year view.

1824
01:43:38,386 —> 01:43:40,386
If it happens in 100,
so much the better.

1825
01:43:41,006 —> 01:43:44,066
Even where we would site
nuclear power plants,

1826
01:43:44,066 —> 01:43:46,295
if we were building nuclear
power plants in, say,

1827
01:43:46,296 —> 01:43:48,006
northern Japan, for instance.

1828
01:43:48,006 —> 01:43:51,306
Where would you site
them, knowing the geology

1829
01:43:51,306 —> 01:43:53,415
of the Pacific Rim
and northern Japan.

1830
01:43:53,686 —> 01:43:56,726
Oh, maybe not too
close to the water.

1831
01:43:57,446 —> 01:43:58,316
I don’t know.

1832
01:43:58,626 —> 01:44:01,376
You need an awful lot of
mindfulness to actually,

1833
01:44:01,376 —> 01:44:04,076
you know, come up with
something like that.

1834
01:44:04,316 —> 01:44:07,456
So it has infinite
number of implications.

1835
01:44:07,456 —> 01:44:10,746
And I apologize for actually
not having spent more time

1836
01:44:10,976 —> 01:44:13,496
on this talk going there.

1837
01:44:13,856 —> 01:44:16,076
It is all in coming
to our senses,

1838
01:44:16,076 —> 01:44:18,156
and there’s an awful
lot happening

1839
01:44:18,156 —> 01:44:19,466
in the world nowadays
around that.

1840
01:44:19,976 —> 01:44:21,616
So we’ll take one more
and then we will stop.

1841
01:44:21,966 —> 01:44:24,796
Two more. If two people are
standing up, I’ll take —

1842
01:44:25,266 —> 01:44:26,826
are you standing
up for a question?

1843
01:44:27,466 —> 01:44:29,066
You’re just the microphone
holder?

1844
01:44:29,366 —> 01:44:30,876
Do you want to sing
or something,

1845
01:44:30,876 —> 01:44:33,436
or just like — this
is your moment.

1846
01:44:33,436 —> 01:44:35,165
I mean, American Idol.

1847
01:44:35,166 —> 01:44:37,836
>> I can make —

1848
01:44:37,836 —> 01:44:41,676
>> This will be —
you want to sing?

1849
01:44:41,996 —> 01:44:47,946
>> I’m hoping — I’m a
resident at the hospital here,

1850
01:44:48,076 —> 01:44:50,206
and I know you’re getting
involved with trying

1851
01:44:50,206 —> 01:44:52,966
to bring this into, you know,
more main stream medicine.

1852
01:44:52,966 —> 01:44:56,566
And I’m hoping it’s not going
to be like, a hundred —

1853
01:44:56,566 —> 01:44:59,516
>> Oh no, it’s already — it’s
already in main stream medicine,

1854
01:44:59,756 —> 01:45:02,436
just — just not here.

1855
01:45:02,436 —> 01:45:07,505
>> Right — so I — I mean, it’s
definitely not encouraged for us

1856
01:45:07,896 —> 01:45:11,656
to take care of ourselves,
and the amount of stresses

1857
01:45:11,656 —> 01:45:14,396
and appointments and
phone calls and now EDH,

1858
01:45:14,396 —> 01:45:17,346
our new computer system —

1859
01:45:17,796 —> 01:45:19,026
>> I heard about that.

1860
01:45:19,026 —> 01:45:21,446
>> — and 30 minute — you
know, I’m in psychiatry,

1861
01:45:21,446 —> 01:45:26,425
and 30 minutes to like, adjust
meds, and also the person wants

1862
01:45:26,426 —> 01:45:27,476
to talk to me and all of that.

1863
01:45:27,766 —> 01:45:31,545
And it’s completely
stressed me out.

1864
01:45:31,656 —> 01:45:35,506
But I can only imagine — and
I’m pretty great [Inaudible]

1865
01:45:35,636 —> 01:45:37,516
and good, you know,
great faculty.

1866
01:45:37,826 —> 01:45:40,766
But if I were to say you
know what, I’m going to go

1867
01:45:40,766 —> 01:45:44,665
to Shimbala to meditate, because
I do meditation in Shimbala —

1868
01:45:45,546 —> 01:45:47,976
>> You mean the Shimbala
meditation center in Colorado?

1869
01:45:48,096 —> 01:45:50,375
>> Well, there’s one in — White
River Junction there’s one.

1870
01:45:50,766 —> 01:45:51,205
>> Okay.

1871
01:45:51,506 —> 01:45:53,366
>> But I’ve, you
know, taken courses

1872
01:45:53,366 —> 01:45:54,916
and like, level 1 and level 2.

1873
01:45:54,916 —> 01:45:58,636
And — but if I were to
say that, you know what,

1874
01:45:58,636 —> 01:46:01,346
I’m going to go for lunch, and
we’re not really doing anything,

1875
01:46:01,346 —> 01:46:03,616
I’m going to go meditate for an
hour, and then I’m going to be

1876
01:46:03,616 —> 01:46:05,936
so much more there
for my patients.

1877
01:46:06,776 —> 01:46:09,746
It probably — even with
these kind, you know,

1878
01:46:10,166 —> 01:46:13,136
good mentors, it’s
not going fly.

1879
01:46:13,136 —> 01:46:16,206
And I advise my patients
on these things.

1880
01:46:16,316 —> 01:46:19,436
But still the medical
professionals are —

1881
01:46:19,436 —> 01:46:19,646
>> You see —

1882
01:46:19,646 —> 01:46:22,706
>> — these superhuman
people that I’m not.

1883
01:46:23,386 —> 01:46:27,056
>> In a talk like this I
can only in some sense point

1884
01:46:27,056 —> 01:46:32,465
to how deeply the
penetration has gone.

1885
01:46:33,096 —> 01:46:35,335
However, what you’re
saying is not deep enough,

1886
01:46:35,606 —> 01:46:37,246
by any stretch of
the imagination.

1887
01:46:37,246 —> 01:46:40,616
And it takes a long, long
time to shift a culture

1888
01:46:40,616 —> 01:46:42,056
that has its own self interest.

1889
01:46:43,096 —> 01:46:43,896
A long time.

1890
01:46:44,636 —> 01:46:45,936
So one —

1891
01:46:45,936 —> 01:46:48,425
>> Just like I’m sure it
takes a long time for people

1892
01:46:48,426 —> 01:46:50,816
to get to your clinic.

1893
01:46:50,816 —> 01:46:53,156
I know the chronic pain
patients we’re seeing,

1894
01:46:53,156 —> 01:46:56,576
we’re not advising, like,
any of the recommend —

1895
01:46:56,576 —> 01:46:57,596
you know, what you guys —

1896
01:46:57,626 —> 01:46:59,726
>> But you could
set up an M B S R —

1897
01:46:59,796 —> 01:47:01,876
maybe there is, is
there an MBSR —

1898
01:47:01,876 —> 01:47:05,286
>> Not even close.

1899
01:47:05,286 —> 01:47:07,606
>> Well, that’s not
that radical to do.

1900
01:47:08,086 —> 01:47:09,086
Are you in psychiatry?

1901
01:47:09,336 —> 01:47:09,466
>> Yes.

1902
01:47:09,826 —> 01:47:11,356
>> Yeah, well, it’s
not that radical to do.

1903
01:47:11,356 —> 01:47:13,965
Maybe medicine should do it,
if psychiatry has an aversion

1904
01:47:13,966 —> 01:47:15,096
to the mind-body connection.

1905
01:47:16,516 —> 01:47:21,326
[ Laughter ]

1906
01:47:21,826 —> 01:47:23,776
>> I even know
gastroenterologists

1907
01:47:23,776 —> 01:47:28,686
who are working with
veterans who have PTSD

1908
01:47:28,686 —> 01:47:33,665
and pulmonologists, I mean, this
goes — transcends specialty.

1909
01:47:33,666 —> 01:47:36,976
>> There are some, and you would
hope psychiatry would the most

1910
01:47:36,976 —> 01:47:38,566
open to it.

1911
01:47:38,566 —> 01:47:39,946
>> Well, I don’t
know if I would hope.

1912
01:47:39,946 —> 01:47:40,756
But you would hope.

1913
01:47:40,876 —> 01:47:43,056
If you hope it, then
make it happen.

1914
01:47:43,056 —> 01:47:47,045
You see, the psychiatry of
the future, where does it lie?

1915
01:47:47,046 —> 01:47:48,856
>> Not in medication.

1916
01:47:49,246 —> 01:47:50,966
>> Well, where does it lie?

1917
01:47:51,036 —> 01:47:52,286
I’m being serious with you now.

1918
01:47:53,246 —> 01:47:56,076
>> Well, I think in the
neuro sciences, and —

1919
01:47:56,076 —> 01:47:59,106
>> No, no, I’m looking for
something much simpler.

1920
01:47:59,346 —> 01:48:00,675
It lies with you.

1921
01:48:00,886 —> 01:48:01,216
>> Oh.

1922
01:48:01,516 —> 01:48:04,135
>> It lies with that impulse
to have come to this talk.

1923
01:48:04,616 —> 01:48:07,596
It lies with that impulse
to go to the Shambala center

1924
01:48:07,596 —> 01:48:09,856
and clear your mind and
then be more present.

1925
01:48:09,856 —> 01:48:12,936
If you want the medicine of
the future to be different

1926
01:48:12,936 —> 01:48:14,596
or the psychiatry of the
future to be different,

1927
01:48:14,826 —> 01:48:17,366
don’t look around for
someone else to do it.

1928
01:48:17,466 —> 01:48:18,316
You do it.

1929
01:48:18,316 —> 01:48:19,986
When will you be good enough?

1930
01:48:19,986 —> 01:48:22,496
Never. Because part of
your mind will tell you,

1931
01:48:22,686 —> 01:48:25,066
you don’t have enough power,
you don’t have enough influence,

1932
01:48:25,066 —> 01:48:25,906
you don’t have enough this.

1933
01:48:26,106 —> 01:48:26,916
You’ve got plenty.

1934
01:48:27,196 —> 01:48:28,256
As a medical resident,

1935
01:48:28,256 —> 01:48:30,616
as a psychiatry resident,
you’ve got plenty.

1936
01:48:30,786 —> 01:48:33,576
And if people don’t want
to do it, that’s too bad.

1937
01:48:33,576 —> 01:48:35,176
But you can take the initiative.

1938
01:48:35,176 —> 01:48:36,126
And I’m not joking.

1939
01:48:36,126 —> 01:48:38,446
I mean, we’re really
talking about a rotation

1940
01:48:38,446 —> 01:48:39,456
in consciousness here.

1941
01:48:39,656 —> 01:48:42,256
And the institutions change
when people are willing

1942
01:48:42,256 —> 01:48:45,876
to actually own how you take it,

1943
01:48:46,106 —> 01:48:48,856
and you’ve had enough
medical training to be able

1944
01:48:48,856 —> 01:48:51,255
to make coherent
arguments that a lot

1945
01:48:51,256 —> 01:48:53,626
of the way the healthcare
system is set up, I’m guessing,

1946
01:48:53,626 —> 01:48:55,746
just from what you’ve said,
is toxic to the people

1947
01:48:55,746 —> 01:48:56,766
that you’re most trying to help.

1948
01:48:57,056 —> 01:48:58,465
What kind of a set up is that?

1949
01:48:58,976 —> 01:49:01,866
Even if you have a better
medical records system.

1950
01:49:04,516 —> 01:49:10,186
[ Laughter ]

1951
01:49:10,686 —> 01:49:12,766
>> Okay, this will be
the last one, then.

1952
01:49:12,766 —> 01:49:14,196
>> There’s somebody
really ahead of me.

1953
01:49:14,296 —> 01:49:17,396
I just wanted to let people
know we do have upper valley

1954
01:49:17,716 —> 01:49:21,296
[Inaudible] associates,
we’re psycho therapists,

1955
01:49:21,296 —> 01:49:23,506
and we’re in our sixth year

1956
01:49:23,996 —> 01:49:27,626
of offering mindfulness-based
cognitive therapy.

1957
01:49:28,066 —> 01:49:32,266
>> Another thing I didn’t get
to really talk about too much,

1958
01:49:32,266 —> 01:49:33,826
mindfulness-based
cognitive therapy.

1959
01:49:33,826 —> 01:49:36,866
But yeah, I mean, there are —
I’m sure there are resources

1960
01:49:36,866 —> 01:49:39,786
in this area, lots of them,
like the Shambala center.

1961
01:49:40,046 —> 01:49:42,806
Are there any MBSR teachers
here, in the community?

1962
01:49:43,056 —> 01:49:43,495
There you go.

1963
01:49:44,146 —> 01:49:44,476
Say —

1964
01:49:46,516 —> 01:49:49,106
[ Inaudible audience comment ]

1965
01:49:49,606 —> 01:49:52,016
>> No, wait a minute, someone
just said no, there’s another

1966
01:49:52,016 —> 01:49:54,036
at Dartmouth, Hitchcock.

1967
01:49:54,036 —> 01:49:58,596
But MBSR is at Dartmouth
Hitchcock?

1968
01:49:58,596 —> 01:50:00,096
[ Inaudible audience comment ]

1969
01:50:00,096 —> 01:50:01,516
>> Well, you see,
the doctor doesn’t —

1970
01:50:02,076 —> 01:50:08,136
you know, so between the two of
you, you have an insurrection.

1971
01:50:09,306 —> 01:50:12,245
How many else — how many other
people are here with that,

1972
01:50:12,416 —> 01:50:15,646
how many are — oh, so
now you have a revolution.

1973
01:50:15,646 —> 01:50:19,526
I mean, you know, listen,
that’s how institutions change.

1974
01:50:19,526 —> 01:50:21,586
And you can do it with
tremendous intelligence,

1975
01:50:21,626 —> 01:50:27,136
with tremendous propriety,
with tremendous intentionality.

1976
01:50:27,366 —> 01:50:28,226
And kindness.

1977
01:50:28,226 —> 01:50:30,736
So that it’s not like you’re
going to go and just sort

1978
01:50:30,736 —> 01:50:32,726
of be obnoxious and tell
everybody what they’re

1979
01:50:32,726 —> 01:50:33,446
doing wrong.

1980
01:50:33,646 —> 01:50:38,366
But to actually offer a new
option that I’m not joking,

1981
01:50:38,366 —> 01:50:39,996
folks, people are dying for.

1982
01:50:40,986 —> 01:50:42,526
People are dying for it.

1983
01:50:42,526 —> 01:50:44,536
Metaphorically and literally.

1984
01:50:45,016 —> 01:50:47,896
And if — there’s never been
more scientific evidence

1985
01:50:47,896 —> 01:50:49,755
in favor of moving
in this direction.

1986
01:50:49,996 —> 01:50:53,686
So in some sense what I’m
saying is the responsibility

1987
01:50:53,866 —> 01:50:56,466
for the future of
not only medicine

1988
01:50:56,466 —> 01:51:00,676
but our society is a
distributive responsibility.

1989
01:51:00,846 —> 01:51:04,075
And as I like to say, the
world needs all its flowers

1990
01:51:04,076 —> 01:51:06,166
and you’re one, whether
your mind says,

1991
01:51:06,166 —> 01:51:08,026
and it’s like depressive
rumination,

1992
01:51:08,246 —> 01:51:10,206
he means everybody else
in the room but not me.

1993
01:51:10,206 —> 01:51:12,386
No, I mean you.

1994
01:51:12,866 —> 01:51:16,876
And see if you don’t recognize
the flower that you are,

1995
01:51:16,876 —> 01:51:19,786
and the genus that you are,
and the beauty that you are,

1996
01:51:19,786 —> 01:51:22,106
and take it and — someplace

1997
01:51:22,226 —> 01:51:26,446
where it can illuminate
some tiny little corner

1998
01:51:26,756 —> 01:51:29,846
that may be insignificant,
but isn’t, you think it is

1999
01:51:29,846 —> 01:51:34,816
but it isn’t, and just apply
what you care most deeply

2000
01:51:34,816 —> 01:51:35,276
about there.

2001
01:51:35,576 —> 01:51:38,516
That’s how health — that’s
how the care gets back

2002
01:51:38,516 —> 01:51:39,585
into healthcare.

2003
01:51:39,806 —> 01:51:43,035
We’re not talking about health
insurance reform, we’re talking

2004
01:51:43,036 —> 01:51:44,846
about healthcare reform.

2005
01:51:45,066 —> 01:51:48,106
And we haven’t seen the
beginning of healthcare reform.

2006
01:51:48,106 —> 01:51:51,626
And when we do, it will be
a participatory medicine.

2007
01:51:51,626 —> 01:51:55,466
It will be recruiting the
interior dimensionality

2008
01:51:55,466 —> 01:51:58,516
and resources that every
single human being by virtue

2009
01:51:58,716 —> 01:52:02,296
of being born a human being
has to one degree or another.

2010
01:52:02,486 —> 01:52:03,986
And that degree is huge.

2011
01:52:04,636 —> 01:52:06,406
And we need to learn
how to recruit it,

2012
01:52:06,596 —> 01:52:09,635
because anything else
will just be technology

2013
01:52:09,636 —> 01:52:13,256
and it will be all doing-based
and none of it being-based.

2014
01:52:13,576 —> 01:52:16,016
And we’re not called
human doings,

2015
01:52:16,016 —> 01:52:17,186
we’re called human beings.

2016
01:52:17,516 —> 01:52:21,675
So at that, I’m going to stop it
because again, the — it’s late.

2017
01:52:21,846 —> 01:52:23,325
But thank you very much
for your attention.

2018
01:52:25,516 —> 01:52:31,690
[ Applause ]